Last Update 16:50
Saturday, 20 October 2018

Prominent Egyptian pro-democracy voice Bassem Sabry dies at 31

Egyptian writer and political activist Bassem Sabry won widespread acclaim across the political spectrum for his astute observations of Egyptian politics

Ayat Al-Tawy, Wednesday 30 Apr 2014
Bassem Sabry
Egyptian prominent Blogger and writer Bassem Sabry (Photo Courtney of Bassem Sabry Facebook account)
Share/Bookmark
Views: 8659
Share/Bookmark
Views: 8659

Well-known pro-democracy blogger and writer Bassem Sabry died on Tuesday at the age of 31.

Widely acclaimed for his advocacy of the 2011 uprising, Sabry – who was also a media consultant and political strategist – died after he fell from the balcony of a Cairo apartment, his friends said.

Writing for an array of local and international media outlets, including al-Monitor, Ahram Online, Foreign Policy and The Atlantic, Sabry was highly respected for his thorough, insightful political analysis. He also wrote his own popular blog, An Arab Citizen.

He was a founding member of and strategist for the Constitution Party -- a liberal party founded by leading democracy campaigner and former vice president Mohamed ElBaradei -- and a member of the campaign team of leftist presidential hopeful Hamdeen Sabahi.

"Bassem Sabry was one of the most beautiful young people I have known in this generation … He dazzled me with his intelligence, depth, broad culture and thirst for knowledge. I was captivated by his tenderness, joviality and enthusiasm. He was a proof that optimism about the future of our country and people was still possible," said Hani Shukrallah, former editor-in-chief of Ahram Online.

Emotions ran high after the announcement of Sabry's sudden death on social media websites and among tens of thousands of his online followers.

Paying tribute to him, Nobel Peace Prize winner ElBaradei wrote: "I ask all the revolution youth to pray for mercy and forgiveness for a companion and a noble man we lost while we desperately need him. Goodbye Bassem Sabry."

Sabry was acclaimed for being among the shrewdest political observers and one of the few voices who continued to fight for freedom in a deeply polarised country and a hostile media environment.

"Just when you think things can't get any darker we lose Bassem Sabry -- a beautiful human being who remained principled throughout the madness," wrote Heba Morayef, former Egypt director at Human Rights Watch.

Economist and blogger Mohamed Dahshan said in a blog post: "He was an extremely astute writer, a gifted analyst, an indefatigable storyteller, and even through the darkness, optimistic to a fault. He was also an excellent bilingual chronicler of the Egyptian revolution, regularly keeping the world informed.

"He demanded rights for all a decade ago… He stood for the oppressed, never condoned injustice, and never censored himself for an unpopular position."

Sabry's funeral will take place on Wednesday at the Mostafa Mahmoud mosque in the western Cairo district of Mohandiseen. Condolences will be received at the nearby Al-Hamdiyyah Al-Shazelya Mosque at sunset on Saturday.

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
3



Eric S.
01-05-2014 05:40pm
0-
7+
Suspicious death
When a pro-democracy journalist who stood for the oppressed falls from a balcony, there is a high probability that he was murdered. I think it is quite likely that there are powerful people who wanted Sabry silenced. That is more believable than saying that he was careless and just fell.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Noha A. Forster
01-05-2014 05:08am
0-
4+
Is it just me...?
Fell off the balcony at his office? Is this a common thing? I can't say I ever knew anyone who was so out of it they fell off a balcony. Especially Egyptians, trained from childhood to sit casually on the railing while their parents hold them. Allah yerHamo. The good die young.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



Aladdin, Egypt
30-04-2014 02:35pm
136-
5+
Lone Voice
I listened to him and he was full of good dreams. The reality is that Western Democracy as destroyed several Arab nations. Middle East is not ready for this kind of democracy because its population is still controlled by tribal inclinations, ignorance, superstition, ...The West is promoting it to breakup us. We need Confiderate Democracy.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.