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Political movements and parties reject Ayman Nour's call for reconciliation

The liberal politician's reconciliation call meets the doomed fate of previous reconciliation initiatives

Ahram Online , Monday 8 Dec 2014
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Meeting the same fate of similar national reconciliation initiatives in Egypt since the ouster of President Morsi in July 2013, a call proposed by Ayman Nour, leader of liberal party, Ghad Al-Thawra last Saturday has been rejected by most political movements and parties.

Nour called on Egyptian civil parties and movements via twitter to compose a "National democratic accord" to reach consensus without polarisation or exclusion. 

Nour, who is among the few secular politicians that is still publicly supporting ousted president Mohamed Morsi, added that his accord would recognise all the mistakes committed by all revolutionary political powers and parties in the past four years. 

Insisting that it is not actually a proposed initiative, Nour, who is currently staying in Lebanon, called on parties and movements as well the public to send him suggestions for what should be added to that "national charter."

Nonetheless the "proposed charter" was rejected by political parties and movements who consider it to be another call for reconciliation with the Muslim Brotherhood. 

Al-Nour Salafist Party rejected the call for the new national charter. "That national charter completely ignored the 30 June revolution and its constitution approved by the public in 2014" leading Al-Nour party member Salah Abdel Maboud told Al-Ahram’s Arabic news website. 

Hamdy Kashata, the leading member of April 6 Youth movement's "Democratic Front" said that his movement rejects any kind of collaboration with the Muslim Brotherhood as long as it still adopted its current policies that spread polarisation and incitement in society. 

"Still we are ready to cooperate with anyone or any group as long as we are united under the 25 January revolution umbrella, not for the return of ousted president Morsi or the return of the 2012 constitution," he said adding that the only way for reconciliation is through accountability and just trials. 

Mahmoud Ezzat, the leading member in Revolutionary Socialists also said that the leftist movement rejected the initiative. 

"Even if all political powers made mistakes like Ayman Nour claims in his initiative, the Muslim Brotherhood made more mistakes when they were in power by making an alliance with Mubarak regime remnants and costing the revolution a lot," he told Ahram Online.

Ezzat added that the Muslim Brotherhood is not ready yet for any reconciliation and will not be until it recognises the mistakes it committed in the past three years.

Mohamed Salah, the official spokesperson for youth in the Justice and Freedom movement also rejected  reconciliation with the Muslim Brotherhood adding that his movement was focusing on establishing a third political current away from military state, Mubarak regime and the Muslim Brotherhood's regime. 

On the other hand Khaled Ismail, a member of the political office of April 6 Youth movement, "Founded by Ahmed Maher" called on political powers to discuss this initiative, hinting at similarities between Nour's initiative and the initiative proposed by the revolutionary youth movement last January. 

Last January the movement proposed a political reconciliation initiative to end political polarisation in Egypt during the anniversary of the 25 January revolution. 

The movement called on all political forces and parties in Egypt to put their difference aside and stop political incitement as well violence. It also called on the regime to adopt a transitional justice law. 

Just like previous reconciliation initiatives proposed by different political parties and forces in Egypt after the ouster of Morsi on 3 July 2013 amidst popular protests, the April  6th Youth movement's initiative was rejected by most of the political powers. 

Last September following his release from detention, former Islamist MP, Mohamed El-Omda proposed an initiative of reconciliation between the government and the Muslim Brotherhood but it was also rejected by all political powers including the Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters. 

The Muslim Brotherhood's led National alliance to Support Legitimacy also proposed a reconciliation initiative following a Cairo criminal court's verdict to drop charges against ousted president Hosni Mubarak last week. This was also rejected by all political powers and parties.

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Ahmed Bata
09-07-2015 02:52am
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Reconciliation is needed on a wider scale than with just the brotherhood
Nour was an early activist, challenging Mubarak well before the arab spring. He should not be dismissed out of hand. The brotherhood and their sympathizers need to be offered a path to rejoin the fold of national unity. It is time to compromise and offer an olive branch, in exchange for acknowledging past partisan mistakes, and a declaration to put country, and all of its citizens, ahead of any religious mandate. A two way dialogue will not hurt, and may yield results.
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waylayer
08-12-2014 07:32pm
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pathetic
'Ezzat added that the Muslim Brotherhood is not ready yet for any reconciliation and will not be until it recognises the mistakes it committed in the past three years.' Let me get this straight -- the Revolutionary Socialists (all 10 of them) helped usher in the counter-revolution and now they want the Brotherhood to apologize? That's rich! You people never cease to amuse!
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