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Al-Azhar and Arab League condemn Paris attack

AFP , Wednesday 7 Jan 2015
France
General view of the street where police and fire fighters work in front of the Paris offices of Charlie Hebdo, a satirical newspaper, after a shooting January 7, 2015. (Photo:Reuters)
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The Arab League and Al-Azhar, Sunni Islam's most prestigious centre of learning, both condemned a deadly attack Wednesday on a Paris satirical newspaper.

"Arab League chief Nabil al-Arabi strongly condemns the terrorist attack on Charlie Hebdo newspaper in Paris," the League said after gunmen stormed the weekly's offices killing at least 12 people and chanting "Allahu Akbar" (God is greatest).

Al-Azhar condemned the "criminal attack," saying that "Islam denounces any violence", in remarks carried by Egypt's state news agency MENA.

In a separate statement to AFP, Al-Azhar senior official Abbas Shoman said the institution "does not approve of using violence even if it was in response to an offence committed against sacred Muslim sentiments".

Charlie Hebdo has sparked anger in the past among Muslims for publishing cartoons of the prophet Mohamed.

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Phil 2
12-01-2015 01:51pm
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Only
Because of the sharif of our zaim al Sisi
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Ted Syrett
09-01-2015 12:53pm
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A matter of principle
If Islam prohibits believers from creating, displaying or viewing pictures of The Prophet, I have no problem with that. If I as a non-Muslim create, display or view pictures of Mohammad, and you threaten my life for so doing, I have a severe problem with that. If it bothers you, don't look at it. Just ignore it. Please! This is how we coexist peacefully in this connected world.
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Neo
10-01-2015 04:00pm
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2 sides to the coin
To Muslims: The picture prohibition issue was relevant 1500 years ago for fear of return to paganism, it should not apply today if we were to move on with the 21st century. To non-Muslims: You’re absolutely correct on viewing what you like, however if you publish what I believe is offensive to my values (right or wrong) you’re insulting my values with no justification. This is not a justification for violence, it is just part of the “principal of peaceful coexistence” I don’t insult your values, and you don’t insult mine, otherwise what is the point of “coexistence!”
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Hani Azzam
08-01-2015 08:08am
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hypocrisy & moral duplicity
They remained silent when Sissi and gang murdered thousands at Rabaa....Now they are shedding croocodile tears to mourn a few Islamophobes who mocked the Prophet of Islam. It is sheer hypocrisy.
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Sam Enslow
08-01-2015 08:02am
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Work in the villages
It is well and good that the murders in Paris are condemned by the highest levels of society, However, work must be done by the clerics of all faiths to end the sectarian divides and hatreds that plague Egypt and the World. It is important that the message of acceptance if the other reach rural villages. In Egypt, that means that Imams and priests must be seen working together on a daily basis to bring communities together. The clerics if different denominations/sects of the same faith must also 'Live and let live.'
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Neo
08-01-2015 01:25am
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Golden opportunity for Azhar and Egypt
Most of us, moderate Muslims, at home and abroad are eager for a legitimate Muslim authority to charter a new course of Modern Islam. We are fed up with the extremists and the crazies hijacking the pulpit to promote their false and backward image of the religion. The Islamic world is looking for a moderate legitimate leadership to restore the image tarnished by the 12 century views. No Western Islamic Foundation can assume this role. Backward Muslim countries in our region can’t assume this role either. This is a golden opportunity for Azhar to be this Global Moderate Voice of Islam, and it would be a great win for Egypt too. Bravo Azhar ...
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