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More than 150 given 2 to 5 years in prison for protesting Egypt-Saudi islands deal

Ahram Online , Saturday 14 May 2016
Protests
Egyptians demonstrate against President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi in Mesaha square of Cairo's Dokki district, April 25, 2016 (Photo: AP)
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More than 150 people were sentenced to between two and five years in prison on Saturday over their participation in protests against an Egyptian-Saudi Red Sea maritime border demarcation deal last month.

A special court circuit processing terrorism-related cases handed 101 people five-year prison sentence and fined 79 of them LE100,000.

All the 111 convicted were charged of "protesting without permit, joining a terrorist group and disturbing the public order and security."

They were arrested in Cairo's Dokki and Agouza districts on 25 April after taking part in demonstrations denouncing a recent government decision to acknowledge Saudi Arabia's sovereignty over the two Red Sea islands of Tiran and Sanafir.

Ten of the 111 convicted were minors who were referred to juvenile court. The general prosecution has also released 64 defendants pending investigations.

Earlier on Saturday, 51 people were sentenced to two years hard labour over their participation in the protests in downtown Cairo.

Thirty-one people were present in court, while 20 were sentenced in absentia following their earlier release pending trial.

Those convicted by the court can still appeal their sentences.

In April, the defendants were referred to court by prosecution for "illegally protesting, attempting to overthrow the government, rioting, inciting against state institutions, disturbing public peace and disrupting traffic."

Thirteen minors were also referred by the prosecution to juvenile court.

Police pre-empted the 25 April protests, surrounding the Press Syndicate, where demonstrations were slated to take place, and firing teargas to disperse protestors before they could gather in large numbers.

The protests marked the second wave of demonstrations against the controversial deal after several thousand, including activists and politicians, rallied against the Egyptian-Saudi agreement on 15 April, in what some described as the largest protests since President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi was elected president in 2014.

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neil
15-05-2016 01:19pm
1-
3+
rubbish
Egypt judicial system shows little inclusion of concepts of crime and punishment. crime; bob marley in 'equal rights', sings: "everybody talking about crime; but tell me, who are the criminals?".[the people say it's the traitors]. is protesting a crime? non-violent protest? as for punishment, there are several types:, equity, let the punishment fit the crime ... non-violent protesting is not even a misdemeanor [fine]; also revenge ... but this vendetta perpetuates a cycle of violence; deterrence, in the case of peaceful protesters, 'making an example' of them, in this case the police state may try to terrorize the people, but the people say these 150 are their heroes, so brave they are risking everything, yet wiling to make this sacrifice for their country. meanwhile, the state can do nothing to deter the turk-saudi-israel sponsored wahabist state in sinai - and now tiran island. Egypt justice system must evaluate role of equity, retribution and deterrence.
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3



Richard
15-05-2016 10:48am
58-
3+
Judiciary & Terrorism
Egypt is fighting on all fronts every day against terrorists while in the same time the Egyptian Government prepaere with the help of directed judiciary the new breeding grounds for adequate always new supply of homemade terrorists, because of exorbitant unfair and rigorous verdicts against pieceful protesters manifesting another opinion as the regime. So, implication of both institutions creating new offspring of terrorists and will be lured by themself in own trap. With this stupid hypocritical counter productive concerted actions they will never win the combat against terrorism.
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2



Sam Enslow
15-05-2016 07:01am
29-
5+
World headlines
This news made headlines all over the world. Another nail has been driven into the coffins of tourism and investment.
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Al
15-05-2016 05:25am
22-
4+
A moronic strategy
The ‘Farce’ of the juridical system, combined with the ‘incompetence’ of the police state are clearly blind. They can’t see that THEY are creating a generation of Egyptian youth bent on hating their country and their government. With the so many unfortunate avenues to be radicalized these days, and the lack of economic means; the police state ignoramus are turning a generation of Egyptian youth into a hateful force of opposition and destruction rather than a powerhouse for economic and social growth. What a bunch of idiots!
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