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Saudi vice committee to force cover women with 'tempting' eyes
In a crackdown on women, Saudi Arabia's moral police in Ha'il will start forcing veiled women whose eyes remain 'tempting' to cover up
Osman El-Sharnoubi, Thursday 17 Nov 2011
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Saudi Arabia
Saudi women in public, (Photo: AP).

Saudi Arabia’s Committee for the Promotion of Virtue and the Prevention of Vice, known as Haia, the kingdom’s religious police, has decreed a stricter dress code for women in the province of Ha’il.

Motlaq Al-Nabit, spokesperson for the Haia in Ha’il, said Wednesday that “the Haia men will intervene to force women to cover their eyes, especially tempting ones.”

The Haia enforces Sharia (Islamic law) in Saudi Arabia and is responsible for supervising public spaces to ensure the separation of sexes, following strict dress codes, and other conduct claimed to be ordered by Islam.

A strict translation of the authority’s name from Arabic would be the Committee for the Ordering (not promotion) of Virtue.

Known to be the kingdom’s second most powerful political body after the ruling Al-Saud family, the Haia's policemen are feared in Saudi streets.

Due to the nature of their job, Haia men may approach and arrest anyone they deem as breaking their rules, even if they are as ambiguous as inciting "fitna," or temptation.

In 2010, Saudi citizen Atallah Al-Rashidi clashed with a Haia member in Ha’il when the Haia member insisted Al-Rashidi’s wife cover her eyes. The scuffle ended with the policeman stabbing Al-Rashidi twice, leading to his hospitalisation.

The case was taken to court and after five months the Haia member was declared innocent and Atallah sentenced to nine months in jail and 350 lashes for “arrogance”.

It is not clear if any standards will be established to separate tempting or provocative eyes from normal ones, nor whether the decree will be implemented on a national level or in Ha’il alone.





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7



the xx
26-11-2011 08:43am
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Judgemental?
@ Insanity: You are right, in the west we would never allow a group of religious officials to gang up on and stab an unarmed man, then lash the victim and put him in Jail. I don't judge everything in the West to be better and I respect the 'cultural' aspect of covering. However, I don't feel it is judgemental to ask a society to respect its citizens and for those citizens subject to the rules (women in this case)to have a say in those rules. I have never read anything in Islam about Haia or about forcing women to cover hands, eyes etc. Just as beauty is in the eye of the beholder, so is temptation. Perhaps those most tempted should cover their eyes or exercise some self control, as directed.
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6



F
23-11-2011 05:08am
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Insanity
Not supporting this version of Islam but just one question - why do we assume that the model set by the west is the way the world should be? Why can't we stop being judgemental about other cultures?
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5



Sara
21-11-2011 04:09am
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wow
unbelievable that anyone could support such treatment of their citizens. The worst part is using religion or culture to excuse this behavior. Religion (and culture) are supposed to the benefit of EVERYONE. Not walls that you hide behind to carry out the abuse of half of your country. If we allow people to do whatever they want because we are afraid to question religious or cultural practices, then of course these will become the tools they use to ensure their position of power at the expense of the most vulnerable. If women were fully allowed to define what it means to be Muslim, would this be happening? Why is it only specific people (in power and getting paid) who get to constantly define and redefine what it means to be Muslim/Christian/Jewish, etc. This is not the result of religion, it is the result of religion being a "protected space" that we are afraid to question.
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4



Andy
18-11-2011 08:57pm
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Unbelievable
History does repeat itself. It seems they are going back a million years (sarcasm). I believe this is complete BS.
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3



Aisha
17-11-2011 11:41pm
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Saudi women need take back their full rights in Islam!!!
Islam actually encourages women not to cover their hands and faces!! Shame on you Saudi Arabia, Taliban no.1!! This is what happens when you allow men to rule you how ever they want!
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nadeem
17-11-2011 10:31pm
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Saudi Arab needs another prophet Muhammad
Inna lilliah wa inna elehe, Saudi Arab will be the last country to learn Islam. Those who are suspicious of Saudi patronage of the Taliban...take another closer look. Regards.
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jay
17-11-2011 07:33pm
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xx
and this would change the way people see religion?
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