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First Dynasty funerary boat discovered at Egypt's Abu Rawash
French archaeological mission discovers 3000BC funeral boat of King Den northeast of Giza Plateau, indicating earlier presence at the Archaic period cemetery
Nevine El-Aref, Wednesday 25 Jul 2012
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a plaque of the boat

During routine excavation works at the Archaic period cemetery located at Abu Rawash area northeast of the Giza Plateau, a French archaeological mission from the French Institute of Oriental Archaeology in Cairo (IFAO) stumbled on what is believed to be a funerary boat of the First Dynasty King Den (dating from around 3000BC).

The funerary boat was buried with royalty, as ancient Egyptians believed it would transfer the king's soul to the afterlife for eternity.

Unearthed in the northern area of Mastaba number six (a flat-roofed burial structure) at the archaeological site, boat consists of 11 large wooden planks reaching six metres high and 150 metres wide, Minister of State for Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim said in a press release sent to Ahram Online on Wednesday.

The wooden sheets were transported to the planned National Museum of Egyptian Civilisation for restoration and are expected to be put on display at the Nile hall when the museum is finished and opens its doors to the public next year.

The IFAO started its excavation works at Abu Rawash in the early 1900s where several archaeological complexes were found. At the complex of King Djedefre, son of the Great Pyramid King Khufu, Emile Chassinat discovered the remains of a funerary settlement, a boat pit and numerous statuary fragments that bore the name of Fourth Dynasty King Djedefre.

Under the direction of Pierre Lacau, the IFAO continued its excavation work and found new structures to the east of the Djedefre pyramid. However objects bearing the names of First Dynasty Kings Aha and Den found near the pyramid indicate an earlier presence at Abu Rawash.





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jac
09-08-2012 01:18pm
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@hagbard...what do you think it might be?
So, then, hagbard, novice that I am, what do you suggest it might be? I just reviewed umpteen pictures and the dimensions seem to fit the purpose. The article said, " ...(IFAO) stumbled on what is believed...", not stated as a fact. Also stated is; found at the site, "...(a flat-roofed burial structure)...". I suppose relics and inscriptions would help to identify it, but apparently thus far that's all they have to go on. Were funerary boats made to be sea-worthy?
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hagbard
02-08-2012 10:11pm
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This is bull
The idea that these were "funerary boats" is an unproven assumption that is ignorant to hold up as absolute fact without at least mentioning other possibilities. The size and amazing design of the other boats found buried in ancient egypt including the one in the pyramid of giza show that they were made by a seafaring people who had a great knowledge of ship making.
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Basem Gehad
30-07-2012 08:18pm
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from the Boat excavtion team
the boat was excated by Yann tristan the director of the misson at Abu Rawash, the Team work who detach the boat and lift it up from the site at abu rowash to the grand egyptian museum conservation center was : Basem Gehad : conservation proffisonal from the Grand Egyptian Museum Conservation Center Abd El Rahamn Medhat : conservation proffisonal from the Grand Egyptian Museum Conservation Center Abied Mahmoud : conservation proffisonal from IFAO and Hassan El Amir conservation proffisonal from IFAO the conservation work was under the supervisson of Michel Wuttmann head of conservation department IFAo and Osama Abu Elkeir Head of the Conservation Center At GEM CC the Boat is 6m long and 1.30 m width may be from local wood , consists from 11 parts the boat was found at the north side of a 1st dynasty mastaba date bake to king Dn
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karla young
18-08-2012 12:18am
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thanx
just want to say thank you for the clarrifacation.so many people are skeptical.i believe you.why wouldnt i?
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ayman
27-07-2012 11:46pm
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congratulation
Congratulation
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Bill Cornelius
27-07-2012 08:22am
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please check dimension?
150 meters is nearly 500 feet long. can that be right? Large for a wooden boat.
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Annie Haward
25-07-2012 06:50pm
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Dimensions
Surely not 6m by 150m from 11 planks however large? 0.6m by 1.50m?
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Terry
26-07-2012 03:24pm
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Funerary boat dimensions
I was beginning to think I was the only person to catch that. Thanks for your comment. Terry

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