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Sunday, 20 October 2019

Egypt’s beleaguered prosecutor-general resigns

Morsi-appointed prosecutor-general Talaat Abdullah steps down following protests by judges; Supreme Judiciary Council has yet to accept resignation

Ahram Online , Monday 17 Dec 2012
General prosecution
Hundreds of judges and prosecution personnel staged a protest in front of the prosecutor-general's office (Photo: Al-Ahram)
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Judge Talaat Ibrahim Abdullah has tendered his resignation late Monday as Egypt’s prosecutor-general, succumbing to mounting pressure from judges and prosecutors only weeks after being appointed by President Mohamed Morsi.

Hundreds of judges and prosecutors had gathered at his office earlier in the day after marching from the Judges' Club building, in protest of Morsi's decision to replace Mubarak-era prosecutor-general Abdel-Meguid Mahmoud with Abdullah.

Representatives from the protesters met with Abdullah's deputy Adel El-Said but failed to reach a conclusion. Accordingly, a group of protesters attempted to enter the prosecutor-general's office to demand a meeting, but security forces deployed to his office banned them from doing so.

Later in the day, El-Said presented Abdullah's handwritten resignation to the protesters.

Al-Ahram’s Arabic news portal reported that Abdullah left his office shortly afterwards escorted by security forces. Protesters chanted in support of the decision.

Abdullah’s resignation has yet to be accepted by the Supreme Judiciary Council.

The appointment of Abdullah as prosecutor-general was announced after Morsi issued his controversial Constitutional Declaration, which made the president's decisions impervious to judicial challenge in November.

In December, Mahmoud, who had been Egypt’s prosecutor-general since 2006, was appointed as head of Egypt’s Court of Appeal upon his request.

Morsi had previously attempted to dismiss Mahmoud and appoint him as the Egyptian ambassador to the Vatican in October.

The latter, however, challenged the president’s decision saying it was illegal and so was able to temporarily keep his position.

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Khaled Abdullah
18-12-2012 02:35pm
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Dichatomy
We are divided about basic human rights of freedom and other nations are moving forward to science/technology. Shame on who claim to be reformers to control the country and its wealth. It is all about money and power.
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Karim
19-12-2012 06:02am
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i´m for Human rights but
i`m for Human Rights but stop telling us that human rights are a precondition for success. Nazis were brilliant scientist. Zionist are good scientist. And china will become the world power.
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hossain
18-12-2012 10:14am
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beware of mubarak's men
they r all mubarak era judges
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Jisan
18-12-2012 07:15am
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Shame
It's now crystal clear that those judges don't want to try Mubarak. Because they are felools.
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Ahmed
18-12-2012 07:09am
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Mubarak Remnants
There is no secrete now,Mubarak diehard remnants in judiciary trying their level best to derail the democratic system and elected president and bring back their old masters. Dissolving the first ever free and fiar elected parliment and then trying to wind up the shura council and consituent assembly was part of their agenda.It's now imperative to clean up the judiciary from these corrupt & political elements if egyptian want to excel in path of a strong democratic system.
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Nazeer Ataullah
19-12-2012 10:35am
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You are right
You are exactly right Mr. ahmed
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Noor el Huda
18-12-2012 05:42am
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Drustrated judges
The Mubarak judges are indeed frustrated. They wanted to undo the revolution and foil the referendum. Hence their latest feat.
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deen
18-12-2012 03:49am
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now game is almost over
it seems opposition judges are frustrated on their inability to challenge referendum new charter will give the power to people
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Arnil
19-12-2012 06:00pm
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Game NOT over
The only balance of power are these judges. Otherwise Democrary is gone and theocracy is now.
Arnil
19-12-2012 06:00pm
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Game NOT over
The only balance of power are these judges. Otherwise Democrary is gone and theocracy is now.
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