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Salafists fail to stop 'Harlem Shake' in Tunisia
Dozens of Tunisian Salafists fail to stop a 'Harlem Shake' dance at a school in the El Khadra neighborhood, as students shouted 'Get out, get out'
AFP , Wednesday 27 Feb 2013
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Tunisia
Protesters shout slogans during a demonstration against security forces after clashes at the US Embassy, at the al-Fatah mosque in Tunis, Sept. 17, 2012 (Photo: Reuters)

Salafist Muslims tried to prevent the filming of current Internet craze the "Harlem Shake" at a Tunis school on Wednesday, but were driven off after coming to blows with students, an AFP correspondent said.

When the dozen or so ultra-conservative Muslims, some of them women in veils, showed up at the Bourguiba Language Institute in the El Khadra neighbourhood, a Salafist bastion, students shouted "Get out, get out!"

One of the Salafists, wearing military gear and carrying a Molotov cocktail he never used, shouted "Our brothers in Palestine are being killed by Israelis, and you are dancing."

The Islamists eventually withdrew, and the students were able to film their production.

On Monday, Education Minister Abdellatif Abid said a probe had been ordered into a staging two days earlier of a "Harlem Shake" by students in a Tunis suburb.

He said there could be expulsions of students or sacking of educational staff who were behind the staging of the dance.

In response, the ministry's website was hacked and a call went out on social media for the staging of a mega Harlem Shake in front of the ministry on Friday.

The incidents come as more and people around the world emulate the craze, which was sparked by a group of Australian teenagers who uploaded a 31-second clip "The Harlem Shake v1 (TSCS original)" onto YouTube earlier this month.

It has since been viewed millions of times.

Video footage, which shows participants smoking, dancing wildly in uncoordinated manner and simulating sexual acts, has spread on the Internet, with dozens of different versions attracting millions of views.

The Saturday version was purportedly staged by students from Menzah 6 district in a school compound, with some in shorts and others wearing fake beards and tunics showcasing the Salafists (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KSDJJsvzpbY).

The Islamist movement has carried out a wave of attacks in the past year, including on cultural festivals and Sufi shrines.

In June, Salafists destroyed works of art exhibited in a chic suburb of Tunis which they considered "blasphemous."

That incident sparked clashes across the country that saw police stations and political party offices torched, in some of the worst violence since the January 2011 revolution that toppled president Zine El Abidine Ben Ali.

The secular opposition regularly accuses Tunisia's ruling Islamist party Ennahda of allowing a slow Islamisation of the society.

The education minister is a member of Ettakatol, a centre-left secular ally of Ennahda.





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Roslyn
28-02-2013 12:41am
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We are only young once!
In many countries it is just an infectious dance, however in certain countries such as Tunisia and Egypt, it is much more than just a dance, it is the youths expressing their right to free expression, shaking off the shackles of a depressed, corrupt past with elders and tradition dictating their every waking move and even thought! Out with the old and in with the new! Modernity if you will over antiquity! We are only young once, lets dance!
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Mareli
27-02-2013 09:28pm
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Dance for free expression
Bring it on, you people! From the Mahgreb to the US Army and Marines, you have found another way to protest oppressive authority. It may not be ballet, but you have some strong moves, and anything that pisses off the salafis is welcome.
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