Last Update 19:21
Friday, 15 November 2019

Egyptian journalist slapped with 4-day detention after surviving army shooting

Egyptian Journalist who was injured after army forces opened fired on him and killed his colleague is accused of possessing unlicensed weapons

Ahram Online, Wednesday 21 Aug 2013
Share/Bookmark
Views: 2979
Share/Bookmark
Views: 2979

Damanhour prosecution ordered late Tuesday the detention of Al-Gomhoreya journalist Hamed El-Barbary, who had survived an army shooting a day earlier, for four days pending investigation after being charged with possessing weapons.

Tamer Abdel-Raouf, Bureau chief of Al-Ahram newspaper in Beheira, was shot dead on Monday evening while driving his car a few hours after the beginning of the state-imposed curfew at 7pm. El-Barbary, who was in the same car, got injured.

After he was hospitalised, El-Barbary testified that army forces at a checkpoint located south of Damanhour, northern Beheira governorate, fired at the car after ordering the driver, Abdel-Raouf, not to pass through. He said Abdel-Raouf complied but forces shot him anyway.

Earlier, Egyptian Armed Forces Spokesman Colonel Ahmed Ali said the forces did not intend to kill them.

In his statement, Ali said that the passengers "breached the curfew, drove quickly towards the security checkpoint and did not comply with calls to stop or warning shots fired in the air."

He added that the car did not stop for the forces to know the identity of its passengers.

On 14 August, Egypt’s interim Cabinet re-introduced a state of emergency, which includes a daily curfew starting at 7pm until 6am in 14 governorates. This came amid recurrent clashes across the nation between security forces and supporters of deposed president Mohamed Morsi.

Journalists and media personnel are officially exempt from the curfew.

Search Keywords:
Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
2



Ahmed Kamel
21-08-2013 04:57am
1-
1+
Unfortunate but necessary !!!!
It is sad that Mr. Abdel Raouf lost his life and Mr. El Barbary almost lost his life for breaking the curfew imposed by our government, to protect its citizens against criminal gangs. It is unfair to blame the police and army who are following the orders from their superiors and who are being targeted by terrorists. In the last 20 years we lost our sense of discipline and unfortunately good people like Mr Abdel Raouf and Mr Barbary pay the price to learn that government orders have to be followed, otherwise we end up with the chaos we have been living in.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



Qazi Raashid
21-08-2013 04:25am
1-
2+
Warning.
The military crackdown will not be only aganist brotherhood.As ,soon as they are able to consolidate the power ,others will soon taste the folly of threir deeds. Even the most benovalent dictator cannt replace the gifts of democracy. I can see the secularists and pro coup people crying wolf. God save Egypt from its military who has sold itself to the enemy.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.