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Militants involved in South Sinai attack arrested: Third Field Army
Army statement comes after Sinai-based militant group Ansar Beit Al-Maqdis claims responsibility for Monday attack
Ahram Online , Thursday 10 Oct 2013
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the South Sinai Security Directorate in Al-Tor
Smoke rises from the security headquarters after a deadly explosion in the southern Sinai town of el-Tor, Egypt, Monday, Oct. 7, 2013.(Photo: AP)

Major General Abdel Nasser El-Azb, the Third Field Army chief of staff, announced on Thursday that security forces have arrested five militants involved in the bombing of the South Sinai Security Directorate.

On Monday, the South Sinai Security Directorate in Al-Tor was bombed by suspected militants, killing three conscripts and injuring 62 others.

Members of the militant cell involved in the attack were arrested after attempting to assassinate Third Field Army commander Major General Siyad Abdel Karim on Wednesday.

On Wednesday, Ansar Beit Al-Maqdis, a Sinai-based militant group, released an online statement claiming responsibility for Monday’s attack against the southern Sinai security headquarters.

The group has previously claimed responsibility for several militant attacks, including the bomb that targeted the interior minister's motorcade on 5 September.



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Samantha Criscione
12-10-2013 04:21pm
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The problem with the Brotherhood is not Islam, but fascism
In reply to Tammy's comment that "a whole religion is getting a bad name world wide" because of the Muslim Brotherhood and allied terrorists in Sinai, I disagree. Events in Egypt PROVE that the problem is not with the Islamic religion per se, but with clerical fascists who demagogically use Islam (just as clerical fascists have used and continue to use Christianity) to cloak their fascist political goals. Doesn't the fact that most Egyptians, meaning, necessarily, for the most part, Muslims, have rejected the Brotherhood -- and "rejected" is putting it mildly -- prove that Islamism does not equal Islam? And consider this: according to Gallup polls conducted over the past two years, Egyptians' attitudes towards the Brotherhood have changed dramatically from 2011 until mid-June 2013. In August 2011, when many Egyptians knew the Brotherhood only from the Mubarak government's attacks on them, the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party had 15% support and 56% opposition, with 29% of the people unsure. Obviously that 56% opposition was 'soft,' because, aided by the destruction of the previously-ruling National Democratic Party and the non-existence of effective, organized opposition to the Brotherhood, by February 2012, according to Gallup, the Freedom and Justice Party had the support of more than 2/3 of the population, while fewer than 1/3 opposed it, and the number who were unsure was down to 8%. Then in June Morsy won the election -- an election conducted in conditions of terror against the Shafiq campaign -- and Egyptians got to experience Brotherhood rule, and what do you know, by mid-June 2013, the figures were even worse for the Brotherhood's party than they had been in August 2011: 73% of Egyptians opposed the Freedom and Justice Party, 19% supported it and 8% were unsure. Which shows that the attitude of Egyptian Muslims towards the Brotherhood cannot be explained by religion, since of course the same Muslims who told Gallup they supported the Brotherhood's political party in February 2012 told Gallup they opposed it in 2013. It is not Islam which events in Egypt has discredited, but clerical fascism. Egyptians have proved that Muslims can fight this fascism, and fight it quite heroically, I might add. -- Samantha Criscione
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Allen
11-10-2013 04:25pm
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Lack of common sense
Hay!! Lady Ashton thinks you should free all these terrorists. Then she wonders why the violence is continuing.
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Tammy
11-10-2013 12:09am
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not helping their cause at all
Are these islamic extremist militants really thinking they are helping their cause at all?? If thats what they think then their brains do not work because they are only making things worse. In my opinion this is a case for military trials & punishment. Civilian court is to nice for blood hungry terrorists like this. Between the militants, the mb & the rest of the islamic extremists they are doing a good job of showing the rest of the world that their religion is one of violence and bloodshed not peace. Such a shame a whole religion is getting a bad name world wide because of people like this.
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