Last Update 10:11
Friday, 23 June 2017

Ethiopian researchers urge dialogue over dam

Ethiopian officials and Sudanese president discuss issues related to the Renaissance High Dam and the best use of Nile water for developmental projects

MENA, Thursday 1 May 2014
Ethiopian dam
A machine digs a ditch at the Grand Renaissance dam in Guba Woreda, Benishangul Gumuz region March 16, 2014 (Photo: Reuters)
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1343
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1343

A group of researchers and members of an Ethiopian intellectual forum have called for dialogue between Nile Basin countries over the construction of its dam on the Blue Nile.

They said they would contribute to the preparation of a framework for the integrated management of water resources in the region, Egypt's state news agency MENA reported.

The intellectual forum was organised by the Centre for Developmental Studies (CDS), a local think tank, and was hosted by Bahardar University, bringing together the country’s most prominent scholars and institutions.

The forum discussed issues related to the Renaissance High Dam and the importance of the Nile River for development purposes.

Sudanese President Omar Bashir participated in the forum along with Ethiopian federal and governmental officials.

Meanwhile, a new Egyptian satellite has been released to monitor construction of the dam.

Egyptian interim Prime Minister Ibrahim Mahlab spoke on Friday during a meeting with Egyptians in Chad about the importance of establishing "distinguished relations" with Ethiopia in spite of the ongoing dispute over the project.

Ethiopia's plan to build the dam has caused discord between the two African countries. The project has been a source of concern for the Egyptian government since May of last year, when images of the dam's construction stirred public anxiety about the possible effects on Egypt's share of Nile waters, the country's main source of potable water.

The planned dam is a $4.2 billion hydroelectric project on the Blue Nile, one of the river's main tributaries.

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
7



Denboba Ali
01-05-2014 09:53pm
0-
1+
Try to bring peace
I think that is not the best solution to bring peace , sharing natural resource fairly and equally is the best solution in this planet, we appreciate your advancement on technology but it is only loose money if you are targeted GERD, please come to the table to discuss in all matters and keep Egypt wrights on the Nile." Ethiopia is Nile and Egypt is a gift of Nile ".
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
6



ALI
01-05-2014 06:23pm
1-
2+
SEASONAL RAINS
OUR SHARED RESOURCE OF WATER SHOULD NOT BE CONTROL BY A SINGLE COUNTRY,NOT ANY COLONIAL TREATIES. WE SHOULD ALWAYS TALK ABOUT SHARE AND CONTRIBUTION OF RAINS INTO NILE RIVER SYSTEM.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
5



teodros
01-05-2014 04:14pm
0-
12+
when old tactics are exposed.
Egypt is always sabotaging Ethiopia.It is well known for the whole world.However,this old tactics is nearing to end.It is funny that Egypt launched spy satellite last month by Russians help to spy Ethiopia and Israel. My question is why Egypt waste her money when it's citizens are hungry. And also this money could have been help for ground water project. Why you need to spy the dam it is not secret it's open.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
4



aLY sAYAD, mAADI
01-05-2014 01:40pm
3-
0+
gOOD iDEA
let US TALK AND PLAN TO DEVELOP AND PROTECT OUR WATER RESOURCES.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
LM
02-05-2014 03:54am
0-
1+
Yes...
Without citing colonial era treaties that have no legal substance whatsoever.
3



Mona Abdel-aziz, Alex
01-05-2014 01:38pm
14-
0+
Decomposed Granite
We all know that Ethiopian Plateaued consists of weathered granite and weak bedrock. the picture even show this as pile of powder sediments. The lake behind the dam will be buried in few decades. Please do more studies to better manage the Chocolate river.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
LM
02-05-2014 03:44am
0-
1+
Please...
The recommendations by the IPoE were for conditions that could theoretically change as construction progressed. Ethiopia and Sudan have agreed to the needed recommendations for further studies. Egypt, interestingly has not done its part which is holding up negotiations. Nowhere in the IPoE report does it suggest construction stop until further studies are complete.
2



Adly Mahmoud, red Sea
01-05-2014 01:33pm
10-
0+
Brown Nile
The Blue Nile carries lot of mud for its water to become chocolate brown. the mud buildup behind the proposed dam will limit its useful life time before paying it initial capital investment. I like the idea of establishing intelligent dialogue to protect all nations water rights and to manage our water resources.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
LM
02-05-2014 03:46am
0-
1+
No...
You like the idea of pretending to engage in intelligent dialogue. I get it, you want to sound so objective and reasonable to make Ethiopians seem like they are the reasonable ones. If you want to talk about intelligent dialogue, you should listen to your own scientists who believe the dam will benefit Egypt as well as Ethiopia. I doubt that you care about Ethiopia's water rights. Nice try.
1



Khofoo, Giza
01-05-2014 01:23pm
11-
0+
Cup and Stick Tests
Test #1: You need to fill a cup with Blue Nile water to see how much mud into water. From this estimate the useful life of the dam; that will never exceed 60 years. Test #2: Apply 18-seconf, vibrating force of 1.5 gravity magnitude to simulate the effect of Afar Region earthquakes on the 4 Km long concrete dam. The dam will breakup from 5-6 magnitude earthquake. My advise: Do NOT do the Dam and use instead modern water wheels (floating turbines).
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
WATONEARTH
02-05-2014 06:27am
0-
0+
SOLUTIONS
Indeed sedimentation (siltation) is an issue to ponder. The same was true of the Three Gorges Dam in China. I believe it is Swiss or German engineers who came up with an ingenious solution. As best as I can understand it, it is was to inbed powerfull aggitating turbines close to the actual dam wher sedement begins to accumilate using the cascading dam water to turn these 4- 6 massive turbines, forcing the sedement up and channeling it through the auxillery or overflow release dam. This is done during the rainy season when erroded suil is at its highest. It thus far has worked flawlessly.
LM
02-05-2014 03:53am
0-
1+
Really?
I find it amusing how you Egyptians are flailing about not knowing how to respond. One moment you're belligerent the next you're professorial. The dam will not exceed 60 years - if it's left idle, which is out of the question. The Benishangul region is in the far West, Afar is in the East. Different geological composition. Floating turbines will not sustain a population of 91 million. You are condescending

Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.