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Wednesday, 23 October 2019

Mubarak faithful seem to exist, and want him exonerated

A good number of Hosni Mubarak’s supporters have maintained their stance after his demise, indicating their faith in the former president was sincere, and they argue that prosecuting him is a tragic mistake

Sherif Tarek , Tuesday 3 May 2011
Pro-Mubarak protesters
Several thousands supported Hosni Mubarak during the January-25 Revolution (Reuters)‎
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Most of the several thousand Egyptians who backed Hosni Mubarak during the January 25 ‎Revolution were believed to be beneficiaries of the old regime, or paid ‎demonstrators hired by the now-dismantled NDP. Curiously, however, a good number of the ‎ousted president's supporters maintained their stance after his demise, indicating that a few ‎people indeed had genuine faith in the 82-year-old.‎
       
During Mubarak’s last few days in power, his disciples described him as a “father to all Egyptians” ‎because of his “undoubted” love for his countrymen, a “hero of war and peace” because he ‎‎“bravely fought” in the 1973 war against Israel and later did not get involved in warfare or ‎hostility with neighbouring countries in order to “keep Egypt safe for many years”, and last but not ‎least a “wise leader” who always makes the right decisions for his nation’s best interest.‎
    
Nowadays, as the deposed commander-in-chief is held captive at the International Sharm El-‎Sheikh Hospital and faces accusations of ordering the killing of peaceful protesters, ‎accumulating illegal profits and persistently abusing his unfettered political power in many ‎ways for years, some people still believe in him and are calling on the ruling military council to grant ‎him amnesty. A smaller group just wants to ensure he receives a fair trial.‎

‎“We must be loyal to this man and to his military and political history,” ‎said Nabil Zanfal, member of the Facebook page "The Union of Mr. President Mohamed Hosni ‎Mubarak’s Fans."  “Even if some of us insulted you [Mubarak], others did not. You ‎deserve all respect and admiration.”‎

On Monday 25 April, Easter Day, Mubarak’s supporters congregated in small numbers at the ‎state television building in Maspero and wanted to stage a sit-in. Some pedestrians were ‎reportedly provoked by their chants, which initiated a verbal joust that later developed into a ‎brawl before army forces dispersed the crowds. Four days later, around 500 pro-Mubarak demonstrators ‎gathered again in the same location and reiterated their demand to exonerate him.‎

Both rallies were not entirely newsworthy, but more pro-Mubarak gatherings are on the cards. ‎Another Facebook page, among others, was launched to invite the devotees of the toppled ‎president to a million-man march, again in Maspero, on Friday 6 May, two days after the ‎ousted president’s 83rd birthday. Only 288 had accepted the invitation at the time of going to press.‎

‎“We need to move fast; insulting the former president is an insult to the whole Egyptian population,” said ‎Mohamed Abdel Fatah, a member of the page. “Like we hate those who killed [ex-‎president Anwar] Al-Sadat, the next generations will blame us for losing Hosni Mubarak. We ‎need to wake up and understand what’s going on.”‎

Alaa Abdel Nabi, a 20-year-old engineering student and creator of the page, told Ahram Online: ‎‎“We call it a million-man march to encourage people to participate. I expect around 50 or 60 ‎thousand to take part.‎

‎“We wanted to travel to him [Mubarak] in Sharm El-Sheikh on his birthday, Wednesday, and ‎bring him cake, just to lift his spirits, but we cannot due to security reasons. So on that day we ‎will congregate in Maspero to tell him ‘Happy birthday’. All Egyptians used to celebrate ‎that day, but now everyone is cursing him. Two days later, we will stage the million-man march ‎to demand his exoneration without trial.‎

‎“This is our primary demand … I hope the Egyptian authorities respond to us; if not, then the ‎revolution, which I am not against, has not succeeded. During the revolt, some three millions ‎went to the streets with certain demands and had them fulfilled.‎

‎“In the same manner, I will gather a number of people to call for Mubarak’s absolution, and that ‎demand should be met also…We don’t want him to stand trial. We have no reservations ‎about trying his son Gamal or anyone else, but not Mubarak whom we are defending as a ‎person.”‎

Mubarak was forced to step down on 11 February, after millions protested against him all over ‎the country for 18 days in a full-scale uprising. He remained under house arrest along with his ‎family members for some time after his overthrow, before he and both of his sons, Alaa and ‎Gamal, were remanded in police custody pending investigation. The latter two were ‎incarcerated in Tora Prison along with numerous former ministers and high-profile ‎government officials.‎

The vast majority of Egyptians, even those who live abroad, wanted to see ‎Mubarak’s 30-year rule come to an end. No sooner had he been brought down than exuberant celebrations broke out across Egypt and in many other countries. They were ecstatic over the ‎destruction of a system “riddled with corruption, embezzlement, deception and nepotism”, ‎and over a dream of a much better future under a genuinely elected president.‎

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Tony
04-05-2011 07:31pm
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HAVE SOME RESPECT
You people say he did not do anything in the 1973 well go read some history first then come talk. then one of you said he became rich from the poor peoples money e.g. taxes. well let me tell you that is a load of rubbish and thats simply because till now we cannot find one reason or one piece of evidence that he is corrupt and that he did order the killing of the protesters. waleed said that he turned people to poverty well Im sorry from that comment i can tell you one thing you are a Communist. tell me waleed why do people in egypt run away from paying taxes well for a start because they are ill mannered people they cry about the state of the country well its because your not paying your taxes and don't say because it all gets stolen thats a cheap way to answer.
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Ahmed M Ibrahim
04-05-2011 04:50pm
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ex-President Mubarak
Mubarak was not only President of Egypt but an outstanding Islamic leader of the world. He was ousted on the initiative of a foreign leader who instigated the Egyptian people against him. If the Egyptians have an iota of self respect let them restore his dignity and allow him to leave in peace as an ex-President. Wishing him all the best on his Birthday.
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Diana Hughes
04-05-2011 01:54am
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President Mubarak
Keep up the good work, supporters of the former President. He has suffered enough, losing his job, family life and reputation. He is 83 years old and it is cruel for so many to be seeking revenge on him. Let him retire in peace and appreciate the good he has done for his country in the Air Force and as President. I trust his 84th birthday in 2012 will be a better one.
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Sami
03-05-2011 07:00pm
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Who are these people?
How psychologically damaged do you have to be confused a brutal, selfish dictator with a father, or even a war hero? And what's this obsession with him as a "war hero" anyway? The guy was the Commander of the Air Force during 1973, a military force that almost played zero role in that war -- and even if it did, even if Mubarak had personally kicked Israel out of Sinai single-handedly, does that somehow render him about the law? Stalin managed to push back invading Nazis, but that doesn't make him any less of the psychopath he
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Ingy Sammakia
03-05-2011 05:04pm
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Mubarak Supporters
I have no sympathy for a man that corrupted Egypt for the past 30 years, while he got rich off the poor's back. I think they should express themselves as they wish, but that either they're in denial or they benefited from this corrupt regime.
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waleed
03-05-2011 02:08pm
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Let him eat cake
If these supporters knew history they would have refrained from proposing to take "cake" to the ex-president. Mary Antoinette have ensured that the words cake and revolution are forever linked. Good people do not wish ill on others, nevertheless this man resided on a political system that turned the life of a whole generation into fear and for the majority into poverty and ended his "rein" with hundreds dead and thousands injured. No sympathy for that and let us hope his supporters will have ample opportunity to take him Halva soon.
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