Last Update 20:45
Saturday, 16 November 2019

All sectors must contribute to Egypt's prosperity, Sisi tells UN

Ahram Online , Friday 25 Sep 2015
Sisi
Egyptian President Abdel Fattah Al Sisi addresses the 2015 Sustainable Development Summit, Friday, Sept. 25, 2015 at United Nations headquarters. (Photo:AP)
Share/Bookmark
Views: 2855
Share/Bookmark
Views: 2855

During his speech at the UN General Assembly on Friday, Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi stressed the importance of having all sectors of Egyptian society contribute to prosperity.

The President called for “Fair and balanced prosperity that benefits everyone, most of all women whose important role in every aspect of life is proven day after day.”

El-Sisi called once again on the international community to help Egypt overcome obstacles in the path of prosperity and to help fight terrorism.

Egypt has been combating a decade-long militant insurgency in North Sinai, which intensified in the past two years following the ouster of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi.

Hundreds of army and police personnel have been killed. The army has also announced the killing of hundreds of militants.

El-Sisi, apparently referencing nationwide protests against Morsi during the ousted president’s last few days in power, emphasised that Egyptians had mobilized to face extremism, saying they will eventually change extreme ideas.

El-Sisi also highlighted the inauguration of the new Suez Canal project, hailing all Egyptians for their contributions to the endeavour, which was finished in one year.

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
6



Masri
27-09-2015 03:08pm
11-
228+
The Army view of the World
There are many threats facing Egypt; Terrorism, Religious extremism (not the same), Poverty, Illiteracy, population explosion, crumbling healthcare, food shortage, mushrooming deficits … etc. Any one of these threats would bring the country to its keens; collectively they would turn Egypt into a failed state in a matter of years. The problem with a myopic Army government is that it only sees the threat it can handle with guns and bullets; not the other dozen that pose more danger; that’s why Egypt failed over the last 40 years despite a strong and well-fed Army!
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Masri
28-09-2015 08:21pm
0-
1+
Right
If I recall; Mubarak was an Army guy, wasn't he? the army ran the country then, haven't they, officers and generals owned all real estate and farms, haven't they? then it was an army government ... You are right in one respect though; they were corrupt!
ayman
28-09-2015 10:29am
223-
0+
Wrong
You consider the Mubarak era of corrupt businessmen as an army government.
5



Rainer Boegner
26-09-2015 04:39pm
702-
348+
Only one sentence
All my respect, success and God bless.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
4



Farhan
26-09-2015 12:59pm
607-
702+
What prosperity ? This thief has been stealing money from Egyptian and most of his budget spent on weapons
How can you be prosperous when most of Egyptian money is spent on protection of Sisi and his propaganda campaigns.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



Sam Enslow
26-09-2015 12:53pm
0-
3+
Reference
I noted an important essay in Al-Ahram weekly that I wish were published on these pages. It is titled Al-Sisi and the fight against corruption and was authored by Moataz Abdel-Fattah. It appears in the Opinion section,
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



neil
26-09-2015 12:53pm
32-
4+
who is the audience
I've liked the President's speech-writer, but I don't think this speech addressed the audience in the UN Assembly, or any foreign audience. The global media have told a narrative of a coup. So a foreign audience is unimpressed with talk of social justice, as most 20th century dictatorships were like Nasser's Egypt. As for united to fight a common enemy, all dictatorships are known for doing this. And the Suez is a point of internal pride. To reverse the coup narrative, it would be better to mention upcoming multi-party elections. Also, what part of the speech addressed the audience self-interest? What would motivate them to visit Egypt or (the rich) invest in Egypt? What issue does Egypt take a leadership issue, that the audience would feel like following? (I am referring to a UN Resolution on Palestine, where words are followed by action; i.e., UN soldiers stationed in a Palestinian 'Autonomous Region')
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



Sam Enslow
25-09-2015 09:09pm
0-
8+
Ahram Weekly
There is an excellent article on corruption and bureaucracy in Egypt. It talks about the 'secrets' of Egypt that everyone knows and how the system itself forces honest people to become corrupt just to survive. These are problems that must be addressed before serious money will be invested in Egypt. As someone who has attempted, once with encouragement from the government, projects in Egypt, I can tell you it is impossible. As soon as one wants to do a project, roadblocks appear. The project becomes impossible. Why would an investor bother when many other countries are open for business? One cannot only talk the talk. One must walk the walk. Let individual Egyptians create jobs. Let foreigners create jobs. Get the government out of the way.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.