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Ten Egyptian ministries reserved for FJP: Brotherhood official

Brotherhood official says that the Freedom and Justice Party will take the ministries concerned with service provision, while other roles such as foreign affairs, interior and justice remain a source of disagreement with SCAF

Ahram Online, Tuesday 24 Jul 2012
Kandil
President Morsi and Newly appointed PM Hisham Kandil (Photo: AP)
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Medhat El-Hadad, head of the Muslim Brotherhood's administrative office in Alexandria, revealed to Al-Ahram Al-Massai newspaper on Tuesday that ten ministerial posts in the new cabinet have been designated for members of the Freedom and Justice Party.

"Political forces and parties will take twelve ministries, in addition to another twelve for technocrats," he added.

El-Hadad said that the FJP will focus on ministries concerned with services such as petroleum, housing, health, agriculture, supply and local development, in order to aid President Mohamed Morsi in fulfilling his main projects, which he announced he will work on during his first 100 days in power.

The Brotherhood member further added that there are tendencies within the FJP to replace the ministry of media with a supreme council of media, further stressing that ministries of education, culture and media will not be under the control of Islamist parties.

Sayyed Negeida, member of the FJP and the now dissolved parliament, further claimed that the party aims to build a coalition within the current phase and for the cabinet formation to be as balanced as possible.  

For his part, FJP member Sayyed Emara claimed that sovereign ministries such as the ministry of interior, foreign affairs, justice and media remain a source of disagreement, with the party rejecting SCAF's interference in the choice of ministers.

Emara added that SCAF will only be given the choice of selecting the minister of defence.

Meanwhile, Yosri Hamad, spokesperson of the Salafist Nour Party, rejected FJP's domination of a fixed percentage of the new cabinet, adding that "this is not a cake to be divided, but rather a nation that should be managed by the most efficient."

Hamad pointed out that the original share of each party in the new cabinet was initially based upon their share in the parliament; however the situation has changed after the High Constitutional Court (HCC) ruling led to the dissolving of the body.

The Freedom and Justice Party, along with the Salafist Nour party, controlled over 70 per cent of seats in the now dissolved People's Assembly.

Alaa Aboul-Nasser, secretary general of the Nour party, emphasised that the party supported Morsi in the elections unconditionally and haven't asked him for any guarantee that they will be represented in the new cabinet.

Earlier on Tuesday, Morsi appointed little-known former irrigation minister Hisham Kandil as the new prime minister.

Kandil met with the president following the announcement and was handed a document of potential candidates for the cabinet's ministries.

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A woman
26-07-2012 08:06pm
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Hello MPA
Hello MPA! I checked it again in the Egyptian Constitution (which is still valid): No minister or ministry (and no Prime Minister as well) has the right to enact a law, the President just has the right to enact decrees or sign agreements or treaties, but also cannot make laws. So also in Egypt the Parlament is the only legislative branch and the only source for new laws.
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Guest
25-07-2012 10:25pm
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Egypt is finished,
it is the Islamic Republic of the Muslim Brotherhood now, for good!
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A woman
25-07-2012 10:22am
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Control???
El Hadat: ".....further stressing that ministries of education, culture and media will not be under the CONTROL of Islamist parties..." Does Mr. El Hadat understand the principle of the independent legislative and executive branches and judiciary in a democratic state? I have my doubts... The ministers (or the members of the government including the head of state) are not there to control something, they are there to EXECUTE the laws done by the parliament, which is (in most of the democratic countries) the only source of legislature. So about what kind of "control" you are speaking, Mr. El Hadat?
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MPA
26-07-2012 01:21am
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I Think the Cabinet can make laws?
Truth be told that in some "democratic" governments, the cabinet/ministries/government has the authroty to make its own laws/decrees without Parliament being involved.. The extent of my knowlege ends there, so someone else should step in and correct me and inform us both on the details.
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