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Egypt's Brotherhood sees first protests against their rule
Liberals and military supporters are protesting Friday against Islamist President Mohamed Morsi aiming to contain what they see as monopolistic Muslim Brotherhood rule
Ahram Online, Reuters, Friday 24 Aug 2012
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Protesters
protesters in front of the Memorial of Unknown Soldiers in Nasr City (Photo: Mai Shaheen)

Dozens of Egyptians are protesting against President Mohamed Morsi in Cairo on Friday, seeking to challenge the Islamist president and his Muslim Brotherhood group on the street less than two months into his rule with a first test of his popularity.

Military supporters, liberals, Coptic Christian organisations and activists behind Friday's call to protest accuse Morsi of seeking to monopolise power after he wrested back authorities in August that the military council, which had ruled Egypt for a year and a half, had sought to retain for itself.

An Ahram Online reporter present at the protests at the presidential palace in the upscale military-dominated suburb of Korba says that the security forces are excessive.

Even all of the roads leading to the Ministry of Defence in the contiguous city are plagued with security and they have set up barbed wire to discourage passage.

The official news agency MENA reported on the closures, meanwhile the Ministry of Health states that security forces and 51 ambulances are deployed among five squares in the area for protesters' safety. 

Roughly a hundred metres away from the Ministry of Defence some 400 protesters are chanting against the Brotherhood, while some are building a tent in front of the Memorial of the Unknown Soldiers.

In Tahrir Square anti-Brotherhood rule supporters are gathered for the Friday Prayers.

"Wake up Egyptian people. Don't fall for the Brotherhood," said Mahmoud, in his 50s, addressing about 200 people in Tahrir Square, the heart of Cairo where protests brought down President Hosni Mubarak in February last year.

With the intense summer heat, protests tend to gather pace later in the day.

"Egypt is for all Egyptians, not only one group," said Mahmoud, who only gave his first name, as he stood on a motorbike in the square where traffic was flowing through.

The protest organisers, among them opposition politician Mohamed Abou Hamed, also want a probe into the funding of the Brotherhood, repressed by Mubarak during his 30-year rule but which has dominated the political scene since he was toppled.

In a morning headline ahead of the protests that had been trailed for a few weeks, the independent daily Al Masry Al Youm called the demonstration "the first test for Morsi."

But several liberal groups that are usually critical of the Brotherhood have not backed the protest. Among those staying away is April 6 youth movement, which had helped galvanise the street against Mubarak in 2011.

The protest organisers, who had named several gathering points, had said they planned to march towards the presidential palace to demand the resignation of Morsi, who was sworn in on June 30, becoming Egypt's first president who was not drawn from the top ranks of the military.

Security officials said it would protect peaceful protests but would act firmly against any lawbreakers after reports in the press and speculation on social media suggested protesters could target premises of the Brotherhood and its political party.

The Facebook page calling for the protest said it would be "peaceful" and those involved would not resort to violence.

Morsi, propelled to the presidency by the well-organised Brotherhood, has formally resigned from the group saying he wanted to represent the whole nation in office.





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14



Umm Ali
26-08-2012 08:38pm
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Morsi is funded by the US State Department
Who's the person who said that the majority of Egyptians support the current president? That is patently false. The election results gave him a minority of support. Most Egyptians did not vote for him. Who's the idiot who's trying to divide Egyptians along sectarian lines. It's not about Muslims and Christians, it's about the US installed puppet called Mohamed Morsi. Trained and educated in the US, he is supported by the US State department. He should not be trusted. The Muslim Brotherhood can not be trusted. They have always worked for the CIA.
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13



Sandy
24-08-2012 08:48pm
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this paper is anti-Islamic, not just anti-Islamist
It is sad that this site only publishes the messages of Copts and other Islamists. Fortunately, they are a small minority.
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12



Mohamed Sri Lanka
24-08-2012 06:42pm
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Islamic State
It is hard Give a real definition to islamic State ,In An islamic state we can find Great Leaders like Umar,The leader who fear only Allah ,The Leader who works only for Allah,The Leader who realy love with own people .The Leader who Take part in peoples work ,They dont need president palace .
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Mohamed Sri Lanka
24-08-2012 07:43pm
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Utopia
Thanks ,Please Dont try to avoid the idea of Good Governence ,Using a Name of Utopia.
A woman
24-08-2012 07:12pm
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Utopia....
Sorry Sir, but I think you must be living somewhere in "Utopia" or must have closed your eyes all day....
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The voice of reason
24-08-2012 06:17pm
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Morsified?...
It is hard to decide whether or not to support these protests. I am a liberal and not a fan of the brotherhood and agree that extreme Islamism will be Egypt's downfall. I do believe in putting pressure on the president and the Brotherhood to act according to the principles of democracy. However, I think it is too early to protest against the President. What people seem to forget is that we have huge economic problems that we need to address. Our economy is in tatters and it is getting worse and worse by instability and protests. No tourists are coming and companies will not invest if Tahrir remains looking the way it did since the 25th of January 2011. Morsi needs to be given a chance and if he fails to meet demands and promises then protesting is reasonable. We have to move forward before we collapse! I was not a fan of Morsi or the brotherhood winning, but I believe in democracy, and I am a liberal and only a true liberal can accept the election result. I would also like to stress t
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10



sherif
24-08-2012 04:34pm
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Down with Morsi!
Islamists will destroy Egypt. DOWN WITH MORSI AND ISLAMIC RULE.
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samy
24-08-2012 09:06pm
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Copts are a minority, they represent the Church, not Egypt.
We know that 99% of the so-called protesters are Coptic Christians. We also that a majority of Egyptians support the President.
Salama
24-08-2012 08:52pm
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it is enmity to Isla,.
It is rejection of Islam, not opposition to the Ikhwan.
Sherif
24-08-2012 07:58pm
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Islamism is incompatible with Democracy
Hector, my misguided Egyptian friend, you clearly have no concept of democracy. Your biggoted language is counter to all democratic principes.
Hector M
24-08-2012 06:41pm
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Sherif
Sherif, the majority will rule, and you Copts will be treated equally now. As Mubarak's days are over you wont be rewarded for your treason. Get used to live in democratic Egypt. By the way US will not be able to help your big mouth demands.
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mohamed salah
24-08-2012 04:27pm
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please don't put insulting pictures
فصبر جميل و الله المستعان علي ما تصفون
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8



Kareem Mahmoud, Alex
24-08-2012 03:52pm
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Religious DIctatorship
Brotherhood group and its criminal associates are aiming to create a religious dictatorship. It is far worse than military dictatorship. Look to Iran what they did with their people and economy?
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George
24-08-2012 09:03pm
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Copts should respect democracy so that they will be respected.
Most anti-Islamist posters here are Copts. Their enmity to Islam is obvious. But they are a small minority.
Ahmed
24-08-2012 08:58pm
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Islam will defeat fascism eventually
Alex, your way is secular fascism, ours is Islam.
Sanna
24-08-2012 08:56pm
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the Ikhwan were chosen by the people, the Liberals are America's lovers.
The Ikhwan, unlike the criminal secularists, came to power via ballot boxes. That is the difference.
Zaki
24-08-2012 06:20pm
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MB majority elected Rule
Hey, Alex you are big mouth piece of the so called dictatorship. You liked Mubarak and his cohorts who rewarded generously for your treason with country.
Abdul hameed
24-08-2012 05:04pm
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egypt will never knee
egypt will not knee for israel and USA and their bullets like mubarak and shafiq. the truth is that your president mursi took up the head of egypt under israel. well done president morsi yu will be the new salahadiin insha allah.
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Abdihamid
24-08-2012 05:00pm
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egypt will not knee for america and israel again.
i am not egyptian i dont support brotherhood or anyorganization in egypt . but the truth is
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Asraf Moukhtar
24-08-2012 03:49pm
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Justice
If someone stole money from, I wont him punished by court; not after death by Allah (SWT). I am good muslim; but not fanatic or silly.
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6



Amir ABdullah, Giza
24-08-2012 03:46pm
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Non-muslim Sheikh Islam
He urged brotherhood members to kill other people protesting agianst the rule of religious dictatorship. Killing others is prohibited in Islam. The fake sheikh should be tried and punished in the court of law.
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5



Kariman Mahmoud
24-08-2012 03:42pm
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Brotherhood of Kazabeen
Promising Utopia under any religous adict is a lie. Look to Eutope during the Dark Age. I would not trust another muslim on $1 million based on good faith or propspect of Allah punnishment after death. Are you silly people?
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