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Egyptian TV host Bassem Youssef accused of insulting Morsi

Egyptian prosecutors have received a complaint accusing Egyptian satirist Bassem Youssef of offending the president during his Jon Stewart-style politics show

Ahram Online, Sunday 23 Dec 2012
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A complaint was filed on Sunday with the prosecutor-general accusing prominent television satirist Bassem Youssef and the channel his television programme appears on, CBC, of offending President Mohamed Morsi during his weekly show Al-Bernameg (The Programme), a format which was inspired by renowned American television host John Stewart's comedic look at politics, the Daily Show.

The accusation concerns an episode dubbed ‘the Presidential Pillow’, which featured Youssef holding a cushion with hearts and the president’s picture printed on it.

Youssef for his part responded to the news via his Twitter account with characteristic humour, demanding that the president autograph the pillow.

A number of similar accusations of insulting the president have been raised against public figures since Morsi came to power, including television anchor Mahmoud Saadi, psychiatrist Manal Omar and journalist Abdel-Halim Qandil.

Bishoy Kamel, a teacher from Sohag, also received a six-year sentence recently for sharing a controversial anti-Islamic film and insulting the president and his family via his Facebook page, charges which he denied.

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Taz
05-01-2013 04:03am
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No one should be immune from satire or critique...
I watched that very episode and did think that it was offensive in anyway to the president.It was nothing compared to the ridicule that Obama (or Bush)receive. If Morsi is offended from satire then he should quit public life, period. Best for him is to grow thicker skin, because what he can't take from Egyptians, he will hear it from someone else in this age of open communications.
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abdul rahman
01-01-2013 02:42am
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Democracy In Motion
The mass demonstrations and the TV hosts ability to play jokes on the president reflects that Egypt has truly embraced demoocracy. Journalist and TV hosts, while enjoying the freedom of speech and expression, must also point out to the public that the revolution is on the right path. Otherwise, they would not have enjoyed such freedom. Don't take all these freedom for granted.
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