Last Update 21:11
Thursday, 19 September 2019

Egypt presidency, judiciary draw closer on proposed legislation

After Sunday meeting between presidency and heads of judicial agencies, President Morsi promises to adopt judges's proposal for new judicial authority law

Nada Hussein Rashwan , Sunday 28 Apr 2013
judiciary
Egypt's President Mohamed Morsi meets with the heads of Egyptian courts, (Photo: President Mohamed Morsi's official Facebook page.)
Share/Bookmark
Views: 2564
Share/Bookmark
Views: 2564

Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi has told Egypt's top judges that he would personally adopt their proposals for a new judicial authority law in hopes of containing mounting tension between Egypt's Islamist forces and the judiciary.

"All obstacles to achieving justice will be discussed at an upcoming conference, including the formulation of new judicial authority laws," presidential spokesman Ehab Fahmi said following a Sunday meeting between President Morsi and the heads of Egyptian judicial agencies.

"The president will personally adopt all recommendations to come out of the planned conference, including draft laws, which he will present to the relevant legislative bodies," Fahmi added. "The president has praised judges' proposals for a 'justice conference' and has asked judges who attended the Sunday meeting to convene on Tuesday to prepare for the conference."

The Sunday meeting was seen as an attempt to clear the air amid an ongoing standoff between the presidency and Islamist parties on one hand, and the judiciary on the other.

The Muslim Brotherhood, from which President Morsi hails, along with other Islamist forces, have been calling on the Shura Council (the upper house of Egypt's parliament, currently endowed with legislative powers) to pass a new judicial authority law.

The new law would see the retirement age for judges lowered from 70 to 60, an outcome opposed by many judges and political forces.

In a separate announcement, Supreme Judicial Council head Mohamed Momtaz Metwally – who attended Sunday's meeting – confirmed the presidency's assertions.

"The president has expressed his full appreciation for Egypt's judicial authority and has commended the idea of convening a 'justice conference'," Metwally announced following the meeting.

Neither of the two statements, however, provided details as to the fate of the proposed judicial authority law. However, Mamdouh Ramzi, a member of the Shura Council's legislative committee, said that Sunday's meeting meant that the current draft law – proposed earlier this month by the moderate-Islamist Wasat Party – would likely not be considered.

"If President Morsi... said he would receive a draft law from the judges and propose it himself to the Shura Council, then we can say goodbye to the draft law tabled by the Wasat Party," Ramzi told Al-Ahram's Arabic-language news website on Sunday.

The months-long standoff between Egypt's presidency and judiciary began in earnest last November, when Morsi issued a decree sacking Mubarak-era prosecutor-general Abdel-Meguid Mahmoud and replacing him with Judge Talaat Abdullah.

The move prompted uproar among much of the judiciary, with a number of judges accusing Morsi of infringing on judicial independence. According to Egyptian law, they argued, the Supreme Judicial Council is the only entity with the right to appoint a new prosecutor-general.

On 19 April, the Muslim Brotherhood organised a Friday rally to demand a "purge" of Egypt's judiciary, in a move that some analysts feared would further damage the group's relationship with the nation's judges.

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
4



Joe
29-04-2013 03:50pm
2-
2+
El B
El Baradei will have a cardiac arrest when he reads this today. What will he be able to complain about next?
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



abdulrahman
29-04-2013 02:02am
6-
6+
Protest Against Judges Must Be Sustained.
Morsi have accepted the Judges views and proposals in totality. This is certainly disheartening to the Islamists who wanted to cleanse the Judiciary of judges creating obstacles against the progress of the revolution. This could probably be the beginning of the parting of ways for Morsi and Islamists. FJP and MB must maintain the protests and pressure which is showing signs of success. I hope al Ahram on line will publish this comment.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



abdulrahman
29-04-2013 01:43am
5-
18+
The President Can Only Recommend Legislation Of Laws
President Morsi is only an Executive who cannot direct the Shura Council, a legislative body. The judges too cannot direct the legislature. The Shura Council, though an interim legislature is independent from interference from the Executive or the Judges. The proposed law from the judges must be thoroughly scrutinized by members of the Shura Council which may adopt wholly, reject or amend as members deem fit. It should not allow the renegade judges to continue sitting as tribunals. They must be retired or transferred to administrative posts where they cannot commit abuse of power. The members of Shura Council! Beware!!! The proposal by the judges may contain legal points disruptive to healthy political developments of Egypt or helpful to Mubarak loyalists.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



abdulrahman
29-04-2013 01:43am
4-
3+
The President Can Only Recommend Legislation Of Laws
President Morsi is only an Executive who cannot direct the Shura Council, a legislative body. The judges too cannot direct the legislature. The Shura Council, though an interim legislature is independent from interference from the Executive or the Judges. The proposed law from the judges must be thoroughly scrutinized by members of the Shura Council which may adopt wholly, reject or amend as members deem fit. It should not allow the renegade judges to continue sitting as tribunals. They must be retired or transferred to administrative posts where they cannot commit abuse of power. The members of Shura Council! Beware!!! The proposal by the judges may contain legal points disruptive to healthy political developments of Egypt or helpful to Mubarak loyalists.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.