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Tri-national report says dam will not severely harm Egypt or Sudan: Ethiopia

Ethiopia stresses that a much-awaited joint report shows Renaissance Dam will not 'greatly harm' either Sudan or Egypt

MENA and Ahram Online, Monday 3 Jun 2013
Nile
Nile river in Egypt
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Ethiopia's Ministry of Foreign Affairs asserted on Sunday that the awaited report on the impact of the Ethiopia's Renaissance Dam on Nile Basin countries by the tri-national committee - comprised of Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia - shows that the project will not "greatly harm" Egypt and Sudan.

The statement issued by the Ethiopian ministry asserted that Ethiopia's Ministry of Water and Power has confirmed that the design of the Renaissance Dam is based on international rules and standards and that it will benefit all three countries: Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia.

"The Tri-partite committee has suggested ideas that aim to help the Nile Basin countries benefit as much as possible from the new dam," added the statement. It also praised Ethiopia for taking the intiiative in forming the tri-national committee "out of good intentions and respect for Egypt."

The joint committee has been studying the impact of the Renaissance Dam project since May 2012.

On Sunday, President Mohamed Morsi met with the committee to discuss their final report.

The meeting was also attended by Egyptian ministers of foreign affairs and irrigation.

Later, Morsi called for a meeting with political forces on Monday to discuss the committee's report. Ethiopia announced on Tuesday that it would begin diverting the course of the Blue Nile, one of the Nile River’s two major tributaries, as part of its project to build the new dam.

The majority of Nile water that reaches Egypt and Sudan originates in the Blue Nile.

The Renaissance Dam has been a source of concern for the Egyptian government with fears expressed that the project, if completed, could negatively impact the volume of Nile water that will reach Egypt.

Egypt will need an additional 21 billion cubic metres of water per year by 2050, on top of its current 55 billion cubic metres quota, to meet the water needs of a projected population of 150 million people, according to Egypt's National Planning Institute.

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Sof
04-06-2013 01:12pm
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Remember the story of Mosses.
The contemporary authocrates of Egypt had refused to accept the request of Mosses about the withdrawal of the Jew from. Egyptains at that time were exploiting the Jew with unhumanistic approach. Now they tend to do same on Ethiopia. Do not be selfish just accept our current offer which otherwise you be forced to swallow the consequence as the Dam is from Up Heaven.
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elias ghoubrial
04-06-2013 04:13am
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NO PROBLEM.....
SAY MR.MOURSI NOT TO BE AFRAID FROM RENAISSANCE DAM....EVERY COUNTRY KNOWS WHAT WILL BE SUITABLE FOR ITS ECONOMY.....
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Gebrekidan
03-06-2013 03:56pm
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Nile for Egypt?
So by 2050...Ethiopia should not consume a single amount of water from Nile! So this is the type of thinking that you want us to accept? Funny
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Euel
03-06-2013 12:29pm
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Ethiopia's unselfish, Humanistic Approach
Ethiopia believes in 1. Win -win approach 2.Equitable and reasonable utilization 3. Insignificant harm 4. True cooperation
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Teweldebirhan Weldegerima
03-06-2013 11:49am
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Let's be governed by scientific knowledge/Religion/Ethics, etc.
It is a stark reality that Ethiopia has already started construction of the Grand Renaissance Dam on the Blue Nile part of its territory. Despite previous arbitrary terms and agrreements concluded by Colonialists, who have ever remained the source of many of the problems in Africa, it is now high time that the Nile countries employ available scientific knowledge as well as International Rules and Regulations on Reparian Rights governing the use of transboundary rivers elsewhere in the world. The old adage that "Might is Right" is no more a solution to the problem and is not sustainable at all. Again, leaders should not utilize the case for political gains. It is totally elogical and irrational as well as unlawful to preclude the right of a country which contributes more than 85% of the volume of the water of the Nile and think of maximizing ones benefits alone. Above all, Ethiopia is only working for a hydropower generation in a river system which, of course, is the minimum you can do under the context of Reparian Rights. It is clearly seen that Ethiopia is most often langushing in poverty and suffering from power cuts, etc while beng the source and the Lions Share contributer of the Nile Water while downstream countries are not efficiently using the water by allowing huge evaporation from a shallow and wide reservoir. To be frank, Ethiopia would impound only a fraction of the water that is being wasted through evaporation due to lack of implementing appropriate water resource management which, of course, is the responsibility and task of all who share the waters of the Nile River. It is now time of not showing ones uirrational strength and fist but common sense as well as international rules and regulations.
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Sewit
03-06-2013 11:40am
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Tri-party report
I think if every country come with positive attitude and respect then the issue will be the question of finding a win-win way/strategy to use the resource. But, if one stick on the colonial era thinking then he/she will certainly be the looser. the only way-out to guarantee a mutual benefit is to use the water resource in a way that benefit the whole region as a whole than to limited individual countries. I think it would be wise to stop talking about the so called "Historic wright" again and again. it would rather be intelligent and timely to accept the reality and join up-stream countries on their effort to develop the resource together for mutual benefit, unless nothing will stop them from doing so as it was the case for very long time before.
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Mechdan
03-06-2013 11:55pm
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Let us not wast time.
Now is the right time for Egypt to make a deal for power transmission line to Ethiopia before other power hungry nations buy it at all. They need to be smart.
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