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Ex-Brotherhood Guide referred to criminal court for 'insulting judiciary'

Akef described Egyptian judges in an interview in April as 'corrupt'

Ahram Online, Saturday 12 Oct 2013
akef
Former Supreme Guide Mahdi Akef (Photo: Reuters)
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Former Supreme Guide of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood Mahdi Akef was referred to Cairo Criminal Court Saturday on charges of “insulting the judicial authority.”
 
Judge Tharwat Hammad, delegated from the Ministry of Justice to investigate cases of insulting judicial authorities and offending its members, issued the order. 
 
Akef said in an interview with the Kuwaiti daily Al-Jarida in April that judges in Egypt were “corrupt.”
 
The former Islamist leader was arrested in July. He is currently detained and also faces charges of inciting the killing of protesters in front of the Muslim Brotherhood's headquarters in the Cairo suburb of Moqattam during the events of 30 June.
 
Egyptian authorities have launched a crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood, arresting key leaders, including the current supreme guide of the organisation, Mohamed Badie, his deputy, Khairat El-Shater, as well as several hundred members since the ouster of former president Mohamed Morsi 3 July.
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Sam Enslow
12-10-2013 06:44pm
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Insult?
Is there a loss in translation when the word "insult" is used? It seems rather strange to have political and government officials always complaining about being 'insulted." This means someone hurt their feelings or does it mean someone slandered or libeled them? In the US, there is a saying, "If you can't stand the heat, stay out of the kitchen." It is almost a requirement for the public to insult politicians and other public figures, without exception. Some barbs are done in fun while some are very serious in nature. In this current case, will the defendant be able to publically attempt to prove his statement that the judiciary is corrupt or that he has reason to believe his statements were correct? I find all these charges of "insulting" the president (a favorite under Morsy) or other public figures to be demeaning to those holding high positions, and laws that have been proven to be easily abused. "Say something against me, and pay lawyers to defend yourself."
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john
12-10-2013 01:51pm
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alarm
The judiciary of Egypt is a big weapons of enemies of democracywe expecting he will make decision as army like..judiciary lost his respect .forever
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