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Egypt and Ethiopia's FMs discuss Renaissance dam in Brussels

The two African foreign ministers had a 'frank and open discussion' that included Ethiopia's Grand Renaissance Dam, a source of contention between the two countries

Ahram Online, Wednesday 2 Apr 2014
Nabil Fahmy
Egypt's foreign minister Nabil Fahmy (Photo: Reuters)
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Egypt's foreign minister Nabil Fahmy met on Wednesday with his Ethiopian counterpart Tedros Adhanom at the two-day EU-Africa summit in Brussels.

According to Al-Ahram's Arabic news website, Fahmy said that his meeting with Adhanom included "a frank and open discussion" on the stance of both Egypt and Ethiopia regarding different matters that concerns both states, including the water of the Nile and the Grand Renaissance Dam (GDM).

No further details were released from the meeting.

On Friday, Adhanom said his country insists on holding talks with Egypt, despite construction for the dam continuing unabated and announcements that it will begin to generate electricity by 2015.

Ethiopia’s planned GDM is expected to be the largest hydroelectric dam on the continent, with 16 turbines, two of which would generate 375mw of power each.

The dam has been a source of concern for Egypt, who worries its share of the Nile's water would be negatively impacted.

Both Egypt and Ethiopia have engaged in negotiations on the dam but to no avail, with Ethiopia insisting the dam won't affect Egypt's water supply and Egypt arguing that not enough research has been conducted on the possible impact of the dam.

The two African countries along with Sudan had previously formed a tripartite technical committee to study the possible impacts of the dam and to attempt to generate consensus on the project.

However, the committee's efforts were thwarted in December when Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir announced his support for the Renaissance Dam during a meeting with Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn.

 

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Lakech
03-04-2014 01:28pm
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Discussion with Egypt?
Good to discuss while working. No progress as usual b/s the discussion is with the arrogant Egypt. Is there any media who can tell Egypt that discussion is not imposition. You can't impose your need on another sovereign country. what type of people are these: Me, Me, me, me and then me, me, me ... again me, me, me... I don't care about you: me, me, .. me me ...
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Salahadin
03-04-2014 09:57am
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The right way to seek solution is accept the fact and not the wish
It is good but the discussion has to be with open heart and readiness to accept the fact at this point of time and all the way in the future. Genuine Dialogue with the upper riparian countries and Ethiopia, It is a matter of acknowledging that the other countries in fact the source of the water have a right as well. Win-win, is mutual solution which the generous Ethiopian and government are currently offering. The GERD dam is about electricity not about irrigation. Moreover the dam has a lot of benefit to the downstream countries: Consistent and unvaried amount of water flow for the whole year, Benefit of low cost electricity for Egypt and Sudan if they wish, avoid siltation problem etc.... This all offer are without little input from Egypt in terms of the water itself, financial as well as moral. Rather it’s so far contribution is funding the proxy war against Ethiopia. The failed strategy of all so far gov’t which rather strengthened Ethiopia's endurance and intelligence capacity all
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