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Egypt's Sisi dissatisfied with parliament's rejection of civil service law

Ahram Online , Saturday 23 Jan 2016
Sissi
Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi speaks at a ceremony marking Police Day, which falls on Jan. 25, the anniversary of the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime ruler Hosni Mubarak, in Cairo (AP)
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Egypt's President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi expressed his dissatisfaction on Saturday with the parliament's rejection of a controversial law which aims to reform the civil service, the first criticism the president has directed at the body since it convened last month.  

In a speech at Egypt's police academy to mark the upcoming National Police Day, El-Sisi said that although he didn't want to interfere in parliamentary affairs, he urged MPs to “further study the issue for the sake of future generations.”

"When a law that aims to reform is presented, and then the MPs view it as a law that can't pass, then okay, no problem… but take note that you're asking me for reform and development. Never consider that such [plans] are an easy task. The responsibility of the Egyptian people is a full responsibility on us all," El-Sisi said.  

El-Sisi cited three main points concerning the law. Firstly, that the state has up to seven million workers, whereas there may be a need for only one million; however, they will keep all workers after the law is passed.

Secondly, he stressed that wages will not decrease by any means, and thirdly, that any raises in salaries will be given to those owed them.

"We are not living alone. We are living while we have to be ready to provide our children and grandchildren with a good future. This is integrity in our hands. Before saying a word, further study the issue," El-Sisi said, his voice animated.

The law, which was signed by Egypt's cabinet in November 2015, has met with widespread criticism by many state employees, labour unions and other labour rights activists, who say the legislation, would destroy the long held rights such as job security, and could also push many thousands of the six million government workers out of work.

On Wednesday, MPs voted 468 to 332 against the law.

The law is likely to be sent to the parliamentary committee on labour issues for further review and modification before returning to the floor of the house.

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Sam Enslow
24-01-2016 02:03pm
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Complex problems
It is true that Egypt has too many government employees.It is necessary to create jobs in the private sector to provide opportunities for the youth. However, although the need for small businesses is often stated. In fact, it is next to impossible to open one. The laws and corruption stand in the way. Egypt cannot afford to pay so many employees. Money must be made in Egypt, products made and sold. Jobs require work, productive work. Egypt has a fascist economy. They have never worked for the same reasons it doesn't work in Egypt, mental stagnation, corruption, nepotism, and inability to meet new trends and challenges. The form/status becomes more important than productivity. As even technologically savy countries try to cope with a fast changing world, Egypt seems to want to go back to 1965. Creativity is needed in a land that loves conformity. Change is needed in a land that loves stability, MAAT. Coordination is needed in a land of isolation (one hand not knowing what the other does
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Pharaoh
26-01-2016 12:56am
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yup
I agree with Sam. Egypt needs to start giving more jobs to the private sector. It needs to meet the demand of the new world through a free-market system. The world has changed, egypt wants to stagnate and die. The people want to live. Make the right choice or face more deleterious consequences than the jan 25 revolution. You have been warned.
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Al
24-01-2016 05:36am
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Not what I hired you for, Abdel-Al
The plan was no single law to be turned, understood! Otherwise the "intelligence Officer" would have a word!
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