Last Update 16:18
Tuesday, 17 September 2019

El-Sisi urges Egyptians to vote in televised message

Presidential candidate Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi hopes at least 40 million Egyptians take to the polls on Monday and Tuesday

Ahram Online , Friday 23 May 2014
El-Sisi
Presidential hopeful ex-minister of defence Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi (Photo courtesy of El-Sisi official campaign)
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1981
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1981

On Friday night, Egypt’s popular presidential hopeful, ex-military commander Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi, urged Egyptians to flock to polling stations on Monday and Tuesday in their millions, saying that elections are a feat Egyptians must undertake to build their future.

Under Egyptian law, Saturday and Sunday will see a halt in public campaigning of any kind for 48 hours prior to the opening of the polls.

In the brief televised address on Friday, El-Sisi made particular plea for young people and women to vote, regardless of their choice, insisting that the love for Egypt binds Egyptians whatever their differences.

“The significance of the ballot box is that there is a consensus on a national level that reflects the strength of the will to depart to the future,” he stated. He gave the example of voting by Egyptian expatriates abroad last week – in which he won 95 percent of votes cast – to show that Egyptians have a will and are moving to achieve it.

The former defence minister stressed that state institutions will exert maximum effort to ensure the safety of voters.

The message followed a three-hour recorded interview with El-Sisi, aired by four local satellite channels (Sada Al-Balad, Al-Qahera Wal Nas, Al-Mehwar, Al-Tahrir) where he spoke of a myriad of issues as he responded to questions posed by eight interviewers.

In the interview, El-Sisi expressed several times his wish that at least 40 million Egyptians come out to vote in the presidential poll.

Over 26 million Egyptians voted in the country’s 2012 elections, just over half of registered voters. El-Sisi said in the interview that he would like to see a full turnout of registered voters next week.

During the interview, El-Sisi vowed he will make real changes that would see Egypt get out of its current economic and security crisis. He said he would not wait for parliament to be formed in order to issue the legislation needed to implement his plans.

“Will the Egyptians wait that long?” he asked.

Reiterating his former antipathy to protests, El-Sisi said that the current phase “can’t bear” protests, saying other priorities, like the economy and poverty, take precedence. He added however that freedom of speech must not be suspended.

The popular former military chief also spoke about his motivation in running for Egypt’s top job, saying that he was called upon by Egyptians to do so and wants to serve Egypt, and is not looking for power or authority.

“I am not far from you; I work this way, I meet people and talk with them I won’t be at the top and let others do the work,” he told his interviewers, dismissing doubts he will be surrounded by cronies.

“No one will be able to take anything [favours] from me. I will take from them but for Egypt not for myself,” he said, claiming such an attitude is what made him popular in the army.

El-Sisi also repeated his plea for Egyptians to choose their representatives with care in parliamentary election. In a striking simile, he likened the choice to the care expended when approving a daughter’s husband.

El-Sisi’s only challenger, Nasserist politician Hamdeen Sabahi, attended his final electoral rally in downtown Cairo on Friday evening, in the attendance of thousands of supporters, including many public figures.

El-Sisi, who led the ouster of president Mohamed Morsi last July after mass protests against the Islamist leader’s rule, is widely expected to win the election by a comfortable majority.
 

Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's
Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 1000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
Latest

© 2010 Ahram Online.