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Thursday, 22 August 2019

Egypt revolutionary groups to protest Mubarak verdict Friday

'The corrupt and tyrannical regime that Egyptians revolted against is back, but the martyrs are not', say protest organisers

Ahram Online , Thursday 4 Dec 2014
Journalists
Journalists protest outside the syndicate in Cairo against Mubarak acquittal verdict on 2 December, 2014 (Photo: Mai Shaheen)
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Several revolutionary groups have announced they will hold demonstrations on Friday against the verdict in the trial of ousted president Hosni Mubarak.

The groups include April 6 Youth Movement, Revolutionary Socialists, Youth for Justice and Freedom, Constitution Party and Strong Egypt Party.

They dubbed the demonstration: 'The Martyr's Right... A popular trial for the ousted president and his regime'.

"The corrupt and tyrannical regime that Egyptians revolted against is back, but the martyrs are not," they said on a Facebook event launched to call for the demonstration.

In a separate statement on Wednesday, the April 6 Youth Movement called for unity among political factions, saying it was the strength of such unity the originally toppled Mubarak in 2011.

The final venue for the protest is still unclear. However, the Facebook event created says it will take place at the Cairo Opera, west of Tahrir Square.

A Cairo court on Saturday dropped charges against Mubarak over his complicity in the killing of protesters during the January 2011 uprising, which ended his 30-year reign.

The court cleared interior minister Habib El-Adly and six of his top aides of charges in the same case.

Mubarak was also cleared of other corruption charges.

While Mubarak's supporters hailed the verdict, opponents voiced their objection. Almost three thousand people protested against the ruling near Tahrir Square on Saturday. Police later dispersed the crowds, leaving two dead.

Students also held demonstrations against the verdict on several campuses around the country this week, including Cairo and Ain Shams.

The banned Muslim Brotherhood also vowed to protest against it. 

The Brotherhood has called on "fellow revolutionaries" to collaborate to protest the verdict. The secular groups calling for Friday's protests, including the April 6, have denied that any collaboration is possible. 

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Bill
05-12-2014 05:13am
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Is Egypt Better Off or Worse Off Since Removing Mubarak
Honest, folks, it is true I am an American, but my heart is Egyptian. I delighted in the new Egypt back in 2011 when I saw Egyptians take pride in finding their voice and striving for freedom. As time passed, I saw the country slip increasingly into anarchy, chaos and insecurity on the streets, and in employment and the country started to again improve, initially, during Morsi. Then, ever increasingly, the slippage returned. Morsi cronies were more inept and greedier than Mubarak cronies. Further, riots and strikes, plus car-jackings became so common that Cairo was Chicago minus a competent law enforcement team. Then, Morsi was removed and many claimed Sisi is the savior. Indeed, the international observers rating the claim the outlook for Egypt now is 'stable.' Perhaps, but I am placing no bets, for I think it too soon to say. What I ask is this: is Egypt better off since Mubarak's removal. If so, who gets the credit? If not, I ask, who is to blame.
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Saba E. Demian, M.D.
04-12-2014 11:32pm
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Mubarak not guilty: a wise judgment or a travesty?
The current instability in Egypt could have created an uncomfortable milieu for Al-Sisi had a different judgment been handed down. There is plenty of evidence to condemn Mubarak on all counts he was charged with. But, there are other overriding considerations which swayed the judges to find him and his entourage not guilty. While most are convinced that Mubarak, his family and cronies have become a non-entity in Egypt the fact of the matter is that there is a residuum in the military and the population at large which hanker for his defunct rule. And not without valid reasons. What followed his relinquishing of power was a virtual nightmare, orchestrated by the Muslim Brotherhood (MB) was a harbinger of evil which Egypt had to go through for over a year of uncertainties and deliberate Islamization of the country. This year of 'terror' was fortunately ended by the so-called correction-revolution which was the will of the people supported by the military, headed by Al-Sisi. This was not
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Saif baba
04-12-2014 02:59pm
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divide and rule
If you study the history of the dictators & repressive regimes monarch of the past and contemporary world it is crystal clear that they only succeeded to rule long time on the masses by adopting the policy of divide and rule. It doesn’t matter how the regime has firm grip on its institutions like judiciary, media & armed forces once the masses united the regime couldn’t stay any longer. The repressive regime always divide the masses on the basis of sect, religion, race and language and political affiliation. Egyptian Repressive regime toppled when masses brushed off their difference they toppled the Mubarak Regime and when CC regime divided the masses into Islamist, secularist, copts, & salafies they again succeeded to repress the Egyptian. Liberals,secularists,islamists,salafies and copts must remember as long as they are divided regime will always face the music of the regime and will never succeed to send them home.
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