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Wednesday, 24 October 2018

Charlie Hebdo's new caricature 'unjustifiably provocative': Egypt's Dar Al-Ifta

Dar Al-Ifta, primary Egyptian authority responsible for issuing religious edicts, condemns new Charlie Hedbo caricature, says it incites sectarianism and obstructs dialogue

Ahram Online , Tuesday 13 Jan 2015
France
French journalists holding up their Press card take part in a hundreds of thousands of French citizens solidarity march (Marche Republicaine) in the streets of Paris January 11, 2015 (Photo: Reuters)
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Charlie Hebdo’s decision to continue the publication of caricatures of Prophet Mohamed is "an act unjustifiably provocative to the feelings of a billion and a half Muslims worldwide who love and respect the Prophet,” Egypt's Dar Al-Ifta warned in a statement on Tuesday.

The new issue of Charlie Hebdo will cause a "new wave of anger" in France and the West in general, the statement said, adding that it "will not serve the dialogue between civilisations which Muslims seek."

The cover of the first edition of the French satirical weekly Charlie Hebdo since 12 of its staff members were killed by Islamist gunmen last week showed a cartoon of the Prophet Mohamed crying and holding up a "Je suis Charlie" sign under the words "All is forgiven."

Dar Al-Ifta, the primary Egyptian authority responsible for issuing religious edicts, described the act as "counter to human values, freedoms, cultural diversity, tolerance and respect to human rights," adding that it "deepens hatred and discrimination between Muslims and others."

The statement also condemned the recent attacks against mosques in France warning that such acts will "give extremists from both sides a chance to exchange violence."

The statement finally requested that the French government, political parties and organisations condemn Charlie Hebdo's "racist act which works to incite sectarianism."

It is common for satirical publications in Europe to mock religious figures.

Following the attack in Paris, Egypt's Al-Azhar, Sunni Islam's most prestigious centre of learning, issued a condemnation, saying that "Islam denounces any violence."

President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi also condemned the attack, voicing Cairo's solidarity with France and underlining that the fight against terrorism is a global concern. 

Egypt's Foreign Minister joined other world leaders in the million man protest in Paris. 

Following the attacks that killed 12 staff members, the surviving employees of Charlie Hebdo have sworn to uphold its tradition of lampooning all religions, politicians, celebrities and news events.

On Sunday, huge crowds in France, including 1.5 million in Paris, took to the streets many carrying signs saying "Je suis Charlie."

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democracia
15-01-2015 03:08pm
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Too absurd
Dear Sobia! No caricature ever killed somebody, or did you ever hear that somebody died from looking at a caricature??????????????????????????? Your comment is too absurd if not to say sick...
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zakki
14-01-2015 06:50pm
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Dont interfere
You also not like if somebody interfere to Egyptian politic. What will be published in other countries is not your bussines. For Europeans is your Prophet not untauchbar...They dont believe at him...if you dont like it, dont read it, simple...
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Arno Nymo
14-01-2015 04:46pm
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Freedom of speech, opinion and press
I don't get it: what of the drawings caused the religious damage? Can the prophet be damaged by words or drawings? How is that possible if one considers him immortal under the protection of the devine order? How come an insult is worth death punishment if one denies the truth or value of the insult? A worthless insult cannot cost real life. Thus, a revenge cannot pay anything else back than worthlessness. If the prophet should not be damageable one should act likewise. So what was the aim to achieve other than scaring people? It is a fundamental requirement to tolerate other opinions in exchange for the right of an own opinion. History told us: violently fighting the freedom rights of others will ultimately lead to the loss of own freedom.
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Alvin J Furrer
14-01-2015 02:03pm
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I am not Charlie !
Whilst I find the terrorist attack on the offices of Charlie Hebdo and the murder of those persons inside, as well as the police officers outside, to be a deplorable and unforgivable act, I would never ever wish to be associated with the publication "Charlie Hebdo" due to it's deliberate attempts to provoke confrontation and to offend others. Furthermore, this outpouring of support for such a disgusting, venomous publication in the name of "Freedom of Speech" is both disgraceful and hypocritical ! If Charlie Hebdo were to print an article denying the Holocaust, or if it were to print comments that were anti-semitic or racist, then the editors and publishers would most likely be brought to justice, fined, and possibly imprisoned. So much for Freedom of Speech.
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Marjina
13-01-2015 08:23pm
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Boycott Charlie Hebdo!
Charlie Hebdo is liable under international law under the UN charter to hurt the religious feelings.No act of terror is justifiable! Million march has given them more immunity which would've easily been avoided.Unknowingly France has put its civilians at more risk & is the victim of the global terrorism that doesn't believe in any religion.Also I feel its recent vote in favour of Palestine is one of the cause.Time is come to recognise our common enemy & resist any act of provocation. And to Egypt thank you for not disappointing & standing for the dear Prophet.
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democracia
13-01-2015 07:27pm
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I hope
I hope that all European newspapers will publish caricatures of Mohamed for at least one week, until you learn that you cannot tell Europe what is allowed to publish and what not! If you don't like it don't look at it!!! That's all!
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democracia
14-01-2015 06:18pm
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Sorry Alvin....
Sorry Alvin, you dare to compare the killing of millions of jews with the publishing of some caricatures of Mohamed??? That is nothing but sick!
Sobia
14-01-2015 02:57pm
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Western Hypcray
Can any newspaper UK insult the Queen ? No, why..? Law dones not allow them...Why don't teach them..? because you are hypcrate...What is freedom of expression..for you..? What ever you like and hurt other, that is freedom of expression...But any thing others others do and hurt you..that is a sin, a crime and terrorism.
Alvin J Furrer
14-01-2015 02:07pm
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I am not Charlie !
Those same European newspapers would be fined and their publishers possibly imprisoned in some European countries if they printed claims that the holocaust never took place, or they printed anti-semetic or racist comments so do not think that the press enjoys full freedom in Europe.
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Micha
13-01-2015 06:05pm
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Mercyful and gracious
My god and his prophet love the freedom of speech because they know what is wrong and what is right. Maybe they laugh at those who pretend owning the truth. Because they are wise, mercyful and gracious.
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patkar
13-01-2015 04:34pm
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what is freedom of expression
Voltaire ( famous french philosofer )vrote " I don't like what you say but I am ready to fight so you can be free to say it" something to reflect about . . .
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