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Loud speakers only for Azan and Friday sermons: Egypt's Awqaf

Ahram Online , Friday 17 Apr 2015
Mosques
Birds fly over mosques during sunset in Old Cairo December 22, 2012 (Picture: REUTERS)
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Egypt's state religious authority has banned the use of loud speakers in mosques beyond the call to prayer (Azan) and Friday afternoon sermons, an official statement said.

The ministry of religious endowments (Awqaf) also warned in Friday's statement that violators could face salary deductions or transfer.

Awqaf asked its employees in different governorates to provide the names of those responsible for mosque property and its speakers within 10 days.

Millions of Muslim Egyptians, men and women, attend Friday prayers in mosques and listen to the recently standardised sermons by Awqaf-appointed Imams.

Islamic jurisprudence mandates Muslims conduct five sets of daily prayers.

In March, Awqaf placed all non-governmental Islamic cultural institutes and preacher training centres under its direct supervision.

Last year, Awqaf mandated all preachers to acquire a permit before administering sermons on the pulpit, banning all unlicensed preachers.

The ministry also prohibited Friday prayers at small, less-regulated corner mosques known as Zawaya.

President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi recently called on Al-Azhar to "revolutionise" its religious discourse in order to guide Muslims to a correct understanding of Islam.

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4



expat
18-04-2015 07:02pm
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125+
happy wishes....and dreams
1. it would be good,if imams in luxor could agree on 1! actual time(as it is,they call at least 5 minutes from the first one accuratly,untill the last sleeping guy is finished) 2.usually they start prior to prayers with recitations and end their prayers with recitations and enligtning to their flock 3.every imam and his flock tries to be the loudest one...sometimes its like metallica against motörhead arround here :) 4 i dont really see any police force able and willing to tell saidi imams to stop..they are to frightened to act and/or are part of the flock :) about the comment of bells below here...i NEVER heard any bell loud enough to compare to mosquee loadspeekers anywhere in middle east or egypt
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expat
19-04-2015 01:52pm
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i dont do your kind of tricks...its simply the truth and even a egyptian can acknowledge that..
whats the problem in criticizing a religion? dont forget, not the excercizing of sura's or psalms makes a religion,but the essence of peace/help for the poor and support of the people in need. every man with ears and eyes can see, whats wrong in egyptian big towns, concerning this topic the horrendous noise of competiting mosqees
Simon
18-04-2015 11:26pm
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Whose backside did you kiss?
To criticize their religion and get 100 thumbs up? Or you did learn the double-click trick?
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Neo
18-04-2015 06:12pm
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Noise pollution
Yes Egypt is a Muslim country and the “Azan” 5 times a day is part of the culture. However, there are 2 problems with that: (1) there are way too many mosques in Cairo, and more often a few mosques in the same street; so when each of them use the loudspeakers 5 times a day for “Azan” it’s very loud and disruptive. (2) Cairo is full of noise pollution everywhere, and in this day and age, what is the purpose of Loudspeakers for prayers and Azan anyway? People who choose to go to mosques for payers will go anyway, the rest who don’t won’t be swayed by the loud often competing voices from the too many mosques. It would be much better if all loudspeakers in Cairo (and Egypt) been banned, including mosques.
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Aladdijn, Alex
18-04-2015 12:45am
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Allah Akber
Finally someone has a deep understanding of true Islam and respect for personal privacy. At the same time, churches bells should be limited too. Tahya Misr
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Farid
17-04-2015 11:03pm
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To obey the law
According to Law 4/1994 on the Environment and its executive regulations Noise pollution is not to exceed 60 dB by day, 55 dB in the evening, and 50 dB by night.
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expat
19-04-2015 02:09pm
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if only...
the sound systems would be good and/or the singers-musicians :)
azeez
19-04-2015 11:25am
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marriage ceremonies on street with loud music all night
what about the marriage ceremonies that are held on street with very loud speaker with music all night people never care for others problems
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