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Nine political parties start initiative for new parliamentary elections law

The political parties participating in the initiative say the government ignored their suggestions in the current parliamentary elections draft law

Ahram Online , Sunday 3 May 2015
Egypt
A woman casts her vote during the first day of the parliamentary run-off elections in Cairo December 5, 2011 (Photo: Reuters)
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Nine political parties in Egypt launched on Sunday an initiative to draft a new parliamentary elections law in order to present it to President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi, instead of the amended current law handed over by the cabinet.

The parties also announced that they were holding a three-day workshop in order to draft the parliamentary elections law that would include their suggestions which were ignored by the government, according to their statement.

In a press conference held earlier Sunday, the Conservatives Party, which called for the meeting, announced that the nine parties demanded President El-Sisi not to issue the laws regulating the parliamentary elections presented by the government until the parties finish their workshop.

Among the nine parties participating in the initiative are: Al-Wafd Party, Conservatives Party, the Egyptian Social Democratic Party and the Socialist Popular Alliance Party.

On the other hand, Salah Fawzy, a member of the government's official parliamentary elections amendments committee, slammed the political parties' announcement and workshop.

"The suggestion of drafting a new law violates the constitution which stipulates that the government is the only one to represent draft laws, while the president and the members of the parliament present suggestions only," the professor of constitutional law told Ahram Arabic News website.

Fawzy added that the nine parties do not represent all the parties in Egypt. "They are only nine parties out of 90 parties," he said.

According to Salah Fawzi, Prime Minister Ibrahim Mahlab held three meetings with the parties about the parliamentary elections laws to hear their suggestions, saying that many of them were already unconstitutional.

Nevertheless, he said that if the president or the prime minister received any suggestions to add to the amended elections law, the drafting committee would study them.

The recently amended parliamentary elections laws are set to be revised by the state council in the upcoming two weeks. After their revision and the approval of the State Council, the government will present the laws to the presidency in order to be officially issued.

Parliamentary elections constitute the third and final step in a political roadmap set forth following the ouster of former Islamist president Mohamed Morsi in July 2013. The first two steps included passing a constitution in January 2014, followed by presidential elections in June 2014.

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Sam Enslow
04-05-2015 08:00pm
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Popular support/programs
Can anyone tell me what any of these parties stand for and where they expect to find support. I know all are anti.US, anti Israel' anti brotherhood, anti terrorist, but no one seems to say what they are for. They want a 'strong' Egypt but refuse to define the term or state how they plan to accomplish their goals and serve the people. Do any of them actually talk with the people to see what they want? Who has shown how they would reform the educational system, the health system, the judicial system, or the police and economy? Any time I speak with Egyptians, they want to know who these people are and what they want to do, 'What is their program?'
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Neo
04-05-2015 08:41pm
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Let us know
Please let us know when you find out. This would be a very valuable essay for Ahram Online
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neil
04-05-2015 03:52pm
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wrong cube root rule
Mr Fawzy dismisses democratically elected officials as non-'government'. For a democracy, stability comes from popular legitimacy, so it helps to follow the right cube root rule, not the wrong one. e.g. of cube rule: 2 cube = 8, 3 = 27, 4 = 64; i.e., under the current Egypt voting system, a party with 20% votes gets 8% seats, a party with 30% gets 27%, (roughly proportional), a party with 40% gets 64%. Not only is this grossly unfair to smaller parties, it can cause instability via wild fluctuations one election to the next, not based on any real changes. 20% and add ten = have 4 times as many seats, 40% and lose ten, have one third as many seats. Manufactured majority – where 40% becomes over 50 - may appear to bring stability, but the sense of injustice felt by the losing 60 creates its own form of instability crisis. instead need 'cube root' to calculate number of members of House. 80 million = 435 seats = same as U.S. Also cube root to calculate seats per governate in Senate
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Cicciolina
04-05-2015 03:28am
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90 Parties!
It is not a typo, there are actually 90 parties vying for a foothold in the Egyptian Parliament! No disrespect for the Constitution, or the smart guy who claims to have had written it, but 90 Parties? Even in Italy’s Cicciolina days there were no 90 parties! How can the political gurus and Constitution Professors explain the logic that everyone and their dog can start a party in Egypt!
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neil
04-05-2015 07:06pm
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right on
Logically, the qualification to register as a party should be consistant with that to register as a presidential candidate, in terms of supporters and in number of regions
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