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35% of preparatory stage students in Egypt are illiterate: Millennium Goals report

The report states that Egypt is unlikely to realise the MDG targets in universal primary education

Ahram Online , Thursday 15 Oct 2015
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Students attend class on the first day of their new school year at a government school in Giza, south of Cairo, September 22, 2013 (Photo: Reuters)
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Nearly 35 percent of preparatory stage students in Egypt do not know how to read or write, the UNDP Millennium Development Goals (MDG) progress report revealed.

The report, issued late September, also revealed that nearly 30 percent of teachers in pre-university education in Egypt are under-qualified, indicating an "incompatibility of qualifications and specialisations with actual teaching needs." 

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) issued the report in cooperation with Egypt's Ministry of Planning, Monitoring and Administrative Reform. 

The report also stated that there is still high classroom density in primary schools in Egypt, reaching 43 students per classroom in 2013/14. It added that the classroom density rate in private schools has reached 32 students per classroom compared to 44 in public schools. 

Net enrolment in primary education has declined from 95.4 percent in 2010/11 to 90.6 percent in 2013/14. 

On the other hand, net enrolment in preparatory education has improved with an average of about 82.1 percent over the years 2010/11 to 2014/15. 

The report concluded that Egypt is unlikely to realise the MDG targets in universal primary education. 

In 2000, the UN issued the Millennium Declaration adopted by 189 member states, including Egypt, and more than 20 international organisations aiming to achieve the minimum level of development by 2015 through the adoption of the MDGs.

The MDGs include eight key goals: the eradication of extreme poverty and hunger; the achievement of universal primary education; the promotion of gender equality and the empowerment of women; the reduction of child mortality; the improvement of maternal health; the combating of HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases; the ensuring of environmental sustainability; and the establishment of a global partnership for development.

Although Egypt is still far from achieving many of the MDGs, especially those concerning poverty and universal primary education, it has achieved some goals including reducing death rates associated with malaria, promoting an equal ratio of girls to boys in primary and secondary education and reducing the mortality rate of children under five-years-old.

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neil
16-10-2015 07:17pm
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3+
ignored advice
I told them not to follow Bush's "no child left behind" program. and to take attendance. and to have government subsidize the third who cannot afford private after-school lessons from public school teachers.
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Tut
16-10-2015 04:45pm
26-
11+
Packed like sardines with no education
May be the aircraft carriers, the tens of jets, and hundreds of tanks acquired this year could help elevate the crumbling education system in Egypt. Heck of job, Government!
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Allen
16-10-2015 07:31am
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1+
Khan is that you on the front row?
I bet these kids are more literate. They would be mortified if they tried to read your posts.
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anti khazar[NOT anti semitic!]
16-10-2015 04:15am
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3+
slow killing
WASN'T and ISN'T the POLICY of every DICTATOR [EXCEPT ABDUL NASSER!] to KEEP the NATION UNEDUCATED, otherwise the NATURALLY INTELLIGENT EGYPTIANS would start to THINK about the MISERY of their LIFE,HOW and WHY are they POOR??? Isn't the policy of SISI to put in the position of an ILLITERATE !!!!!MINISTER of EDUCATION ,this action is MORE THAN WORDS!!It SHOWS PERFECTLY the AIM of the CURRENT government too .which is STILL OBSESS with the POLICY of the HIMSELF UNEDUCATED MUBARAK WHO HAD DESTROYED the COUNTRY THROUGH of THREE GENERATIONS and the QUALITY of today is OUTSTANDINGLY HORRIBLE!!!!Those ,whose are INTENTIONALLY 'STEALING' PEOPLES' LIFE by NOT PROVIDING NATION WIDE EDUCATION and as a PRESIDENT FOLLOWING the 'LET IT GO 'policy' must be PUNISHED with the CAPITAL PUNISHMENT ,because they are just like MURDERERS whose are committed GENOCIDE in a FEAR of LOSING POWER,MONEY and CONTROL!!!!
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Sam Enslow
15-10-2015 07:50pm
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Population, Illiteracy - The biggest threats
It is a shame that population growth and illiteracy, the gravest dangers Egypt faces, are not seen as such by those who rule Egypt. I have read comments by some who believe the uneducated better serve the interests of the elite. Mistake. The ever growing numbers of this permanent underclass will prevent a good leader from accomplishments and appeals to their emotions with lies or half truths will lead to the coming bloody revolt.
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