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Tuesday, 12 November 2019

Egypt says consultancy firms behind failure to reach agreement on Ethiopia dam

The Egyptian FM spokesperson stressed that officials will not give up on Egypt's water security and that Sudan, Ethiopia and Egypt will reach an accord in the upcoming round of talks

Ahram Online , Thursday 17 Dec 2015
Ahmed Abu Zeid
Foreign ministry spokesman Ahmed Abu Zeid (Al-Ahram)
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Spokesperson for the Egyptian Foreign Ministry Ahmed Abu Zeid told reporters on Thursday that the French and Dutch consultancy firms working on Ethiopia's Renaissance Dam were the reason no agreement was reached in the latest talks, MENA reported.

"The last tripartite meeting – between the irrigation and foreign ministers of Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia – was crucial as the two firms stumbled in reaching an agreement," Abu-Zeid said.

He also stressed that Egypt hopes that the three countries will reach a consensus in the upcoming round of talks, due to take place in the Sudanese capital Khartoum on 27 and 28 December.

"The anxiety that Egyptians feel towards this issue is legitimate, but we should not take this to another level; officials will not give up on Egypt's water security," says Abu Zeid.

The official stressed that the Ethiopian side is keen to put into consideration the impact studies of the dam, stressing that they are of a common interest to all three countries.  

Sudanese Foreign Minister Ibrahim Ghandour said he believes an agreement between the countries could be reached in the upcoming round of talks.

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam, scheduled to be completed in 2017, will be Africa's largest hydroelectric power plant with a storage capacity of 74 billion cubic metres of water.

Egypt has repeatedly expressed concerns that filling and operating the dam on the Blue Nile will negatively affect its water supply. Ethiopia has continually rejected these claims.

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Mubarak
18-12-2015 06:03pm
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Aim to be water secure from withing
Why does Egypt choose to be billy and water insecure? It floats on the Nubian Aquefer with enough water to supply Egypt for 400 years if Nile stops flowing. Its surrounded by teh sea and can desalinate as much as possible for its people. Does Egypt really thing it can prevent upstream countries from using Nile water forever? More dam and irrigation projects are coming up based on the Nile. Instead of wasting time giving money to upstream countries and buying old military ware and ships, I would say build desalination plants and sink boreholes to tap underground water. 50% of Egypt water needs should come from within, then and only then will Egypt become water Secure not relying on 90% water from 2000 kms outside its borders.
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neil
18-12-2015 03:58pm
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why even bother to make a statement
complete nonsense. everyone knows, or should know, that Ethiopia's 'leaders' continue construction, with no hint of returning to the original dam size/power, until it's a fait accompli, while Egypt's 'leaders' appear to be happy to go along with this.. everyone knows, or should know, that Ethiopia refused to give the consultants any information necessary to do their job... now Egypt's government diplomats have this idea that being nice to Ethiopia's Zionist-influenced leaders will bring positive results.. I imagine that Ethiopia's leaders are laughing and feeling the usual contempt that bullies feel towards nice guys.
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garowe
18-12-2015 01:33pm
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Nile from Ethiopian soil
The Nile as part of the natural resource of Ethiopia should also be of fair benefit to ET. Do not Imagine of getting the Lion's share that was unilaterally agreed during colonial era or that with Sudan. I think this is far from possible. The best thing is to utilize it fairly & equitably although this is not beneficial for Ethiopia since It is entitled for 100% share of water that originates from its soil as source of this River.
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expat
17-12-2015 07:39pm
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is there...
any kind of adult behaviour left in egypts senior system? pointing the finger,accusing anybody or everybody instead of self critizism becomes boring because its used in EVERY field this politicians fail..
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expat
18-12-2015 08:25pm
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will never forget...
the war durms and the big ego shows when the plans went from paper into real construction work...egypt was on fire,demanding to stop everything,demanding not to loose one liter of nile water,as if they would be the only owner of it all....demanding to honour a treaty from 1930,when the BRITS ruled your country,a shame in itself to fall back on dictatorship agreements like this...egypt has no government..it has some clowns playing ego on public radio and TV
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