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Tuesday, 12 November 2019

No Egyptian official will cede Egypt's water security, says FM Shoukry

While underlining the strategic nature of water resources to Egypt, Foreign Minister Shoukry added that the Nile River links Egypt and Ethiopia 'in the course of history and forever'

Ahram Online , Saturday 19 Dec 2015
Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry	 (Reuters)
Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry (Reuters)
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No Egyptian official will ever cede Egypt's right to its water security, Egyptian Foreign Minister Sameh Shoukry said in an interview with Al-Ahram daily published Saturday.

"Any Egyptian citizen should be assured of the ability of Egypt and its negotiators to protect its water interests," Shoukry said.

Shoukry said that the Ethiopian Grand Renaissance Dam issue is one that represents a major challenge for relations between Egypt, Sudan and Ethiopia, as it impacts each country directly.

Shoukry's interview with Al-Ahram comes a few days after Egypt expressed hope that the three countries will reach a consensus in the upcoming round of talks, due to take place in the Sudanese capital Khartoum on 27-28 December.

Shoukry said that current negotiations have now reached an "important crossroads."

Shoukry added that the technical aspect of negotiations was stalled due to the failure of the two foreign consultancy firms, Dutch Deltares and French BRL, to work together, leading to a series of meetings between representatives of the three countries to try to agree on other consultancy firms to undertake studies related to the impact of the dam.

Shoukry said it was important to reaffirm the "Declaration of Principles" signed between the heads of the three countries in March 2015 and the timeframe agreed to ensure that after the technical studies are conducted the three countries would be able to agree on clear and strict regulations on the first filling of the dam and its operation to preserve the interests of all in accordance with the recommendations of the consultancy firms.

The Egyptian foreign minister said that it was important that everyone acknowledge the strategic nature of relations between the three countries, adding that Egypt is keen on avoiding any harm to any party.

"There is no doubt that there is a negative legacy in the Egyptian-Ethiopian relationship that is originally due to long years of disparity and indirect communication, and a reliance on negative impressions about one another at a time where the Nile actually connects the destiny of two countries in the course of history and forever," Shoukry said.

Egyptian-Ethiopian relations have witnessed decades of tumult, including under the ousted regime of Hosni Mubarak.

The Ethiopian Grand Renaissance Dam, scheduled to be completed in 2017, will be Africa's largest hydroelectric power plant with a storage capacity of 74 billion cubic metres of water.

Egypt has repeatedly expressed concerns that filling and operating the dam on the Blue Nile will negatively affect its water supply. Ethiopia in turn rejected these claims.

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Alula
20-12-2015 04:51pm
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Might is myth
Remember, the water is inside Ethiopia. We do not even need to fight you. We just drop a few Kilograms of Radioactive Isotope into the water when it leaves from Sudan to Egypt saving Sudan. You need 1 million years to clean it and by then you will be dead of thirst in three days and as such we do not even need to fight with you. We just bomb the water when you bomb the Dam.
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Alula
20-12-2015 04:45pm
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Might is myth
If you take out our Dam? we will take out not your Dam, but we will take out your country from Africa and destroy it completely. You must know we are Ethiopians, we are not banana republic. We have the strongest, war hardened Army that can even march to Cairo. You would not believe this. Egypt is not Israel. You are over-estimating yourself which could led you to miscalculation and completely lose even a liter of the water. We have the smartest leaders who are war artist. Do you know Siye Abraha? You do not kow him? He is called Alula 2, Alula 1 has defeated Egypt three times with stones, not with guns. Siye is a well known war artist and architect and he design wars and he can finish Egypt in one week. No Ethiopians scared of the Lazy Arab Gluttons. Bring on your bomb, Lazy asshole. There is nothing Ethiopia needs from you. You need Ethiopia, Ethiopia does not need you. You have been at war with us using proxy war because you know you can not fight us directly.
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Tut
19-12-2015 08:15pm
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How would Israel react?
Perhaps Egypt should take a page from its neighbor's security book on protecting its interests. When a country like Syria or Iraq builds "questionable" installations that may threaten Israel, they swiftly take them out. The dam is almost finished with no sign that Ethiopia will reveres course on its completion no matter how much negotiation Egypt calls for. Let them run it and if it proves to jeopardize Egyptian water security; all it takes is 2 F16's to take it down. Is it legal? who is the judge!, is it justified? yes; Egypt been trying to call for talks and negotiation for years and Ethiopia is buying time to finish it. Let them finish it and see how it impacts Egypt; the remedy is not that complicated, ask Israel!
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Allen
21-12-2015 11:05am
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Tut the only thing you should be in charge of is...
Your own bowl movement.
M Zak
20-12-2015 03:53pm
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A last resort
Bombing of the dam is a last resort. Don't forget the Egypt has a dam of its own and it is not very well protected with air defenses. Egypt should continue to use diplomacy with Ethiopia and all Nile Basin Countries. If diplomacy does not work, a swift bombing is not off the table. However, this will cause irreparable damage to the relations between Egypt and the Nile Basin countries and may prompt an arms race between the countries. Live and let live.
Raymond Bates
20-12-2015 11:58am
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No need for Belligerence
This has very little to Do with Israel no matter how you contrive it. Are you not listenning to what the man is saying. The three countries are forever connected by way of this river. Threats of destruction, I hope, remain to be the domains of Israel and the west.
Masresha
20-12-2015 11:45am
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don't fool yourself
Dear moron Tut. The way out of this situation is cooperation and acceptance of Egyptans
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