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Wednesday, 13 November 2019

Egypt, Ethiopia, Sudan ministers to receive Renaissance Dam technical report

Tuesday is the last day of meetings to discuss the technical offer by the two French consultancy firms

Ahram Online , Tuesday 9 Feb 2016
Renaissance dam
Labourers work at the Grand Renaissance dam in Guba Woreda, Benishangul Gumuz region March 16, 2014 (Reuters)
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The Ethiopian Renaissance dam tripartite technical committee will present a report of the French consultancies' technical offer to the irrigation ministers of Ethiopia, Sudan and Ethiopia Wednesday.

Tuesday marks the third and last day of the committee's meetings in Khartoum.

The tripartite committee has been discussing the joint technical offer by French consultancy firms BRL and Artelia.

Egypt had said the three countries received the technical offer in January to be studied and discussed by the tripartite committee.

A Sudanese official told MENA Monday that the first day's meetings ended on a positive note and that there was mutual understanding between the three parties about common interests.

The contracts with the two consultancies that will conduct impact studies of the dam should be signed early February, Egypt's foreign ministry said last month.

The technical committee was tasked in 2013 to choose consultancy firms to conduct a study on the social, economic, and environmental impact of the dam and a study on the dam's hydraulic effect on downstream countries Egypt and Sudan.

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Wedi Wedom
10-02-2016 08:26pm
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Egypt's Burden of Proof
Instead of stepping on the throats of water thirsty Ethiopians, the best course for Egypt would be to improve the water use efficiency by adopting efficient irrigation technologies like drip irrigation and low dose systems, avoiding hydrophilic crops like rice and cotton, avoiding excessive storage of water in the high evaporation zones like Aswan dam, improving water reuse, adopting desalination technologies, utilizing the ground water contained in the Sahara Aquifer, harnessing wind and solar power, etc……. The study should also consider the effect of climate change on water shortage over time. Not all water loss should be accounted for upstream impoundment. This all should be considered during the study not only the amount of water stored in the Lake Meles Zenawi (GERD). I pray for wisdom to Ethiopian negotiators (technical persons and politicians).
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Wedi Wedom
10-02-2016 08:23pm
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About Egypt's Abuse to Nile?
I am very much hoping that the talented Ethiopians like Gideon Asfaw, feka Ahned Negash, et al would be able to avoid falling into traps that Egypt is systematically laying down. What about the ecological, economic and social impacts of the dam to Ethiopia? This should also be included in the study as a positive impact, without which Ethiopia will continue to suffer from the impacts of desertification, food insecurity, El Nino, poverty, etc. We have already been negatively impacted for centuries that are on record. What about Egypt’s abuse of Water: 30% of loss in agricultural water use (that consumes 85% of the Nile) 2 billion cubic meters of water loss to evaporation 3 billion cubic meters to grass growing (including luxury parks and golf courses) 2.3 billion Cubic meters - is lost to leaking in municipal pipes and drains. I pray for wisdom to Ethiopian negotiators (technical persons and politicians).
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