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EgyptAir could lose up to $2 million if daylight saving time cancelled: Chairman

Parliament is scheduled to vote on cancelling or keeping daylight saving time

Ahram Online , Saturday 2 Jul 2016
EgyptAir
In this August 21, 2015 file photo shows an EgyptAir Airbus A320 with the registration SU-GCC taking off from Vienna International Airport, Austria (AP)
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EgyptAir could lose up to $2 million if parliament votes for cancelling daylight saving time, originally announced to begin 5 July, state news agency MENA quoted the chairman of the public company as saying.

In April, the government announced that daylight saving time would be applied by the first week of July until the end of October.

However, a parliament subcommittee agreed this month to cancel the practice, putting the decision to a vote in front of the entire parliament.

EgyptAir Chairman Safwat Mosallam said, "Either way, cancelled or not, the company would deal flexibly with the parliament's decision."

The International Aviation Transport Association (IATA), according to Mosallam, has already been informed that daylight saving would be applied in July.

If parliament votes to cancel daylight saving time, this would cause a number of delays in flights and would cause many passengers to miss their connections, Mosallam added.

Last week, Minister of Parliamentary Affairs Magdy Al-Agati told parliament that the Egyptian government paid $8 million to the IATA after the state did not apply daylight saving time in April.

Parliament speaker Ali Abdel-Al said last week that the House of Representatives has not yet set a final date for the end of daylight saving time, as it is awaiting the State Council's final advisory opinion on the matter.

The system was first implemented in the country in 1988 as a power-saving measure.

It was abolished in April 2011, with the government arguing at the time that the practice was ineffective at curbing power usage.

The system was temporarily revived in May 2014 in order to ease power consumption after the country suffered rolling power blackouts.

Egypt is normally two hours ahead of Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) and Greenwich Mean Time (GMT), leaving it three hours ahead if daylight saving time is applied.

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Expat
03-07-2016 02:22pm
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Lack of confidence
The main problem here is not whether DST is good or bad it's about Egypt's lack of confidence when they take decisions like this. A clear stand on this and other issues would help this country so much.
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medo
02-07-2016 04:04pm
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Welcome to Egypt
This practice is done all over the world. It is a way to save electricity, it is a way for businesses to make more money, it is a way for farmers to do more work. Here we have no electricity... so we decided to cancel the thing that can save electricity... here businesses are losing money so we decided to cancel the thing that can make them money. Why do we continue to believe we are better than anyone else and yet still continue with such backward practices that harm us?? I do not see people in Europe crying because there will be more sunlight for a day!
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Sam Enslow
03-07-2016 11:02am
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@medo
This situation apparently applies to the Mogamma Building. The offices are to be moved, but no one knows to where.
medo
02-07-2016 06:34pm
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@Sam
A decision was made.. it was meant to start before Ramadan, however, to make the month easier the date was changed.. Parliament then decided to challenge the decision and once again we are going round in circles!
Sam Enslow
02-07-2016 05:14pm
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Advanced planning
The problem is not 'daylight savings time' or 'no daylight savings time.' The problem is no decision has been made less than a week before it is to start. How can anyone plan when they do not know for what they plan? This affects most government policies. One event is never connected to another.
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