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Wednesday, 13 November 2019

Video shows police breaking truce

Ahram Online reporters in Tahrir say CSF forces unilaterally broke a two-hour old truce with protesters unprepared for the latest wave of tear gas attacks

Ahram Online , Wednesday 23 Nov 2011
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Views: 7677

Central Security Forces (CSF) broke the two-hour-old truce that was reached between protesters and the police in mid-afternoon.

A video circulating on the internet shows how protesters chanting "Peaceful, peaceful, peaceful" as they stood in Mohamed Mahmoud Street were taken unawares and came under a sudden attack from security personnel.

Ahram Online reporters on the scene say that CSF troops started attacking protesters who were gathered peacefully in Mohamed Mahmoud Street near the entrance of Tahrir Square. CSF soldiers also attacked protesters in Falaki Square from the direction of Mohamed Mahmoud Street.

Mohamed Mahmoud Street, directly south of Tahrir, has been the scene of constant clashes and tear gas attacks by the police forces over the past five days.

The brief cessation of hostilities came as a result of a truce brokered by a number of independant figures and the Ministry of Interior.

The street is littered with debris from the battles and the smell of tear gas still permeates the air, stinging the eyes of protesters who walk back and forth chanting "We will not leave, he [SCAF] should leave" and "Muslims and Christians are one hand."

"The truce is only temporary," a protester had, propheticaly, told Ahram Online earlier in the afternoon as the people on the street made their way back to Tahrir Square.

"It is only to give a chance to the general procecution [who went to investigate the clashes] to finish their mission. However we don't trust the police. They might attack again at any time."

Many protesters went back to the square to rest. Meanwhile animal rights activists have been busy rescuing pets stranded in a petshop on the street.

Indeed, CSF armoured vehicles remained in streets leading to Tahrir Square during the two hours of relative calm.

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Ty
24-11-2011 05:41am
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Egypt
I think that the Egyptian people protesting in Tahrir are committed to a liberal democracy that protects the rights of all its citizens. The challenge will be using the momentum of the protests and activism to build this rather than letting it be co-opted by powerful factions within Egypt or abroad.
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Ty
24-11-2011 02:52am
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Egypt
I think that the Egyptian people protesting in Tahrir are committed to a liberal democracy that protects the rights of all its citizens. The challenge will be using the momentum of the protests and activism to build this rather than letting it be co-opted by powerful factions within Egypt or abroad.
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Maria Allen
23-11-2011 04:56pm
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police vs. soldiers
This makes no sense to me. Why is one arm of the government protecting citizens from another arm of the government? What does it matter whether it is the army or police that fire tear gas, beat demonstrators, or shoot them? They are BOTH part of the same government. If the SCAF can't control what the Interior Ministry does, they should resign. If they allow what the Interior Ministry does, they should resign.
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Umish
23-11-2011 04:47pm
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Civil Rifghts
I hate to be the harbinger or bad news, but at the rate your system is going you will become another islamic republic with no civil rights. Is this what you all really want or do you want to have a secular country where all minorities, religious, ethinic all share the same rights and privilages. Because once you go down the slippery slop of a theocratic governemtn, there will be no rights. Be forewarned
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