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Wednesday, 23 October 2019

Ex-intelligence officer launches Egypt presidential bid

Former general intelligence officer Hossam Khairallah, a veteran of the 1973 war who currently heads an investment firm, to make bid for country's highest office

Ahram Online , Monday 2 Jan 2012
Former Lt.General Hossam Khairallah
Former Lt.General Hossam Khairallah (Photo:Internet)
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Hossam Khairallah, a former lieutenant-general in Egypt’s General Intelligence Directorate, formally announced his presidential candidacy at a Monday press conference held at Cairo’s Grand-Hyatt hotel.

A veteran of the Yemen conflict in the 1960s and the 1973 war with Israel, Khairallah served in Egyptian intelligence for 28 years before retiring in 2005.

Khairallah currently serves as chairman of the Nile Investment Company and chairman of the New Cairo Club.

Khairallah is not Egypt’s first post-revolution presidential candidate to have a military pedigree. One week ago, former prime minister and Egyptian Air Force lieutenant-general Ahmed Shafik officially launched his own presidential campaign.

Following the ouster of former president Hosni Mubarak, former army chief-of-staff Magdy Hatata was also briefly touted as a potential presidential candidate before withdrawing from the contest in December following five days of violent street clashes between anti-government protesters and security forces.

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Bob
03-01-2012 12:45pm
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Truth & Reconciliation ala Mandela
The Mandela government proved a successful revolution can result well when it provides the opportunity to come clean and apologize for past abuses. Egypt is a terrific nation composed of outstanding God-fearing peoples whom I believe will do the right thing if given half a chance. Revenge is not the solution. Rather, inquiry, investigation, confession and forgiveness can open the door to a brilliant future.
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NO!
03-01-2012 11:50am
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EW
EWWWWWW!
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hamashtin bakir
03-01-2012 10:21am
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Waking up from military rule
I agree with Mr. Madsen. Let me add that while analogies can be misleading, it is worthwhile thinking of the process to democracy that had been made in latin and south america as they emerged from military Juntas and think how a similar process might play in Egypt. Without a history or culture of democratic participation and an entrenched 'strong man' leadership, which has always been the army behind the scenes, it make take generations for non-military personnel to be able to assume leadership positions with a liberal support based behind them. There's no quick happy ending to Egypt's revolution story.
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Bob
03-01-2012 12:40pm
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Reconciliation
What might benefit Egypt more is a truth and reconciliation commission much similar to that held under Mandela in South Africa. Taking revenge for past horrors will only beget further horrors down the road and will do nothing to heal the pain.
Bob
03-01-2012 12:40pm
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2+
Reconciliation
What might benefit Egypt more is a truth and reconciliation commission much similar to that held under Mandela in South Africa. Taking revenge for past horrors will only beget further horrors down the road and will do nothing to heal the pain.
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Jon Erland Madsen
02-01-2012 06:35pm
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A torturer in the presidental chair?
It is impossible to serve in the Egyptian intelligence for 28 years without having initiated and overseen torture of prisoners. Retiring in 2005, he also probably had a hand in the American "retentions" of suspected terrorists: As they could not be tortured in the USA, they were flown to Egypt to be tortured by the intelligence services there.
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