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Great Pyramid of Giza can concentrate electromagnetic energy: Study

A study published by the Journal of Applied Physics in July said the Great Pyramid could help scientists to create new nanoparticles that could be used to develop highly effective solar cells, among other applications

Ahram Online , Wednesday 1 Aug 2018
Pyramids
People and a camel stand next to the pyramid of Khufu, during a reopening ceremony of the Sphinx, in Giza, November 9, 2014 (File photo: Reuters)
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Egypt's Great Pyramid of Giza could be capable of concentrating electromagnetic energy in its internal chambers and under its base, a new study has claimed.

A study published by the Journal of Applied Physics in July said the Great Pyramid could help scientists to create new nanoparticles that could be used to develop highly effective solar cells, among other applications.

Nanoparticles are between 1 to 100 nanometres in size. The Russian physicists behind the study investigated the electromagnetic response of the Great Pyramid to radio waves.

“Legends associated with these amazing structures excite the imagination of people, engendering various fables and baseless assumptions,” said the physicists. They affirmed, however, that science still has much to learn about the complex structure of the pyramids and their possible uses.

The study was conducted by ITMO University in Saint Petersburg, Russia, and the Laser Zentrum in Hannover, Germany. 

The Great Pyramid, originally constructed for Pharaoh King Khufu, was constructed in and around 2,500 BC and is one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. It soars to a height of 479 feet (146 metres). Until the Eiffel Tower was built in 1889, the Great Pyramid stood as the tallest manmade structure for more than 4,000 years.

"The study shows that the pyramid, because of its shape, can concentrate electromagnetic radio waves in certain locations under the pyramid itself," according to former researcher in solar energy Rami Louca.

Louca said that the authors will continue to study the effect on other radio waves of different wavelengths.

"The concentration of the radio waves by the pyramid can be thought of as an effect similar to the action of a receiver dish," Louca said.

"Note that the study assumed the pyramid is composed of limestone, however the inner composition of the pyramid may be different," the researcher added.

"It may be possible to place radio receivers at specific positions around, inside or under the pyramid while using a parallel beam radio source above the pyramid to test the results of this study."

Louca explained that "it may also be possible to infer some info about the inner structure of the pyramid (specific types of stone and empty spaces inside) from the measurements done by these receivers."

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