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Muslim Brotherhood blames police for Port Said disaster
Brotherhood spokesperson launches a scathing attack on the interior ministry in the wake of the deadly clashes following the Masry-Ahly football match in Port Said
Hatem Maher, Wednesday 1 Feb 2012
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Al-Ahly
Team players of the Egyptian Al-Ahly club run for safety during clashes following their soccer match against Al-Masry club at the soccer stadium in Port Said, Egypt Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012. (Photo: AP)

The Muslim Brotherhood spokesman has pointed the finger at the interior ministry following Port Said’s deadly football riots which left more than 70 dead and hundreds injured on Wednesday.

Thousands of Masry supporters invaded the pitch following the end of an Egyptian Premier League game against Ahly, confronting the visiting fans immediately after the final whistle.

The ensuing clashes sent shockwaves across Egypt, marking one of the country’s worst disasters since January’s revolution which ousted former president Hosni Mubarak.

“The security vacuum continues, the police officers are punishing us for revolting,” Brotherhood spokesman Mahmoud Ghozlan said in a television interview in the late hours of Wednesday.

“This is another episode of the kind of violence which happened in Maspero, Mohamed Mahmoud and in front of the cabinet during the past few months.

“In all those incidents, the authorities failed to hold anyone accountable,” he added.





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5



richard
02-02-2012 12:23pm
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9+
Football tragedy
Muslim Brotherhood were quick to blame the police for causing this tragedy. As always they blame others in order to deflect attention from their own responsibilities and shortcomings. We can expect to see many more examples of this dishonorable blame game over the coming months and years.
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Karim Hari
02-02-2012 05:37pm
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2+
MB again
what kind of responsibility must take. They don`t have even hold the Power yet if they get it someday.The Ultras were used by the secularist forces as there populist movement after the failed attempts to use the copts and sufis. Stop the confusing game.
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Omar
02-02-2012 10:14am
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Taking responsibility rather than passing the blame to others
Football violence has being an ongoing problem in Egypt since well before the revolution. In the 90’s the UK suffered from out of control football violence (although mainly alcohol driven so I’m not sure what our excuse is!). It was the fan, players, Club managers and football association. That came up with the solution to introduce ID cards for the fans which had to be shown when buying tickets and entry at games. Club introduce their own security staff to check for people carry weapons (and drink). Anyone caught misbehaving was banned from the club and the list of banned people was shared with other club as part of a national data base of Thugs and hooligans. The problem in Egypt is from within the game we cannot blame the police and army for badly behaved fans.
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3



Dorothy
02-02-2012 01:17am
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DO YOU REALLY THINK THIS WAS ABOUT A FOOTBALL GAME?
I have lived safely in Egypt for over 30 years and have never seen anything like this. Do you really believe this was about football???? I feel truly sorry for Egypt today.
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2



Hakim
02-02-2012 12:20am
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5+
ASHAME
I am not really surprised about the incident occured today in Egypt. As an Algerian, I've already got an idea about what some Egyptian are capable to do for football. Ashame for you, you deshonoured the arabians.
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1



Stuart Walker
01-02-2012 11:50pm
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Football Violence in Egypt
These people are not football fan's they disgrace the teams that they are suppose to support. It's the Responsibility of the football club, and the fan club associations to kick out these thugs and hooligans, and ban them from all football games in Egypt. The UK had to go through the same process some years ago when faced with the same problem. This is the only way the game of football will survive in Egypt. The fans and clubs have to accept responsibility for their action and stop making excuses and blaming others. This Problem begins and end with those associated with the game of football, fans, players, managers and sports ministers.
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