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UPDATED: Egypt's constitutional court suspends presidential decree restoring People's Assembly
In notable escalation, High Constitutional Court issues verdict freezing Sunday's presidential decree reinstating lower house of Egypt's beleaguered parliament
Sherif Tarek, Tuesday 10 Jul 2012
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Parliament

Egypt's High Constitutional Court (HCC) on Tuesday issued a ruling suspending President Mohamed Morsi's Sunday decree reinstating the People's Assembly (parliament's lower house) – a verdict that could mark the beginning of a tense new chapter in Egypt's ongoing parliamentary saga.   

In mid-June, the HCC declared the law that governed last year's legislative polls to be unconstitutional. One day later, Egypt's then-ruling Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF) ordered the dissolution of the People's Assembly.

Morsi's executive decision on Sunday to restore parliament's lower house – one of his first acts as Egypt's first freely-elected head of state – was met with both praise and condemnation, with many legal experts questioning the move's legality. The Egyptian Judges Club, for one, an informal grouping of judicial officials, unleashed a fierce attack on Morsi and his executive decree.

The president's office, for its part, asserted that Morsi's surprise decision did not conflict with the HCC ruling that led to the dissolution of the Islamist-led People's Assembly – only with the SCAF's subsequent decision to dissolve it.

Pro-Morsi demonstrators had gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Tuesday afternoon for a scheduled million-man march in support of the president's reinstatement of parliament's lower house, only to be slapped with the HCC ruling calling for the suspension of Morsi's decree.

Following the announcement of the verdict at around 7pm local time, emotions in the flashpoint square ran high.

"This decision is obviously politicised and confirms that the HCC remains a tool of the former regime," one Tahrir Square protester told Al Jazeera.

"All these judges were appointed by Mubarak," asserted another.

While mobilising in the square and the streets, the Brotherhood is also reportedly mulling legal escalation.

"We have filed a lawsuit calling for the replacement of the presiding judges, who weren't qualified to rule on the case," Muslim Brotherhood lawyer Abdel-Moneim Abdel-Maqsoud declared in the wake of Tuesday's court ruling.

Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood, of which the new president had long been a leading member, are also demanding the abrogation of last month's SCAF-issued 'constitutional addendum,' which grants Egypt's military council wide-ranging powers at the expense of the dissolved People's Assembly and presidency.

As of press time, Morsi's office had yet to deliver a formal statement on Tuesday's constitutional court ruling.





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Abi
12-07-2012 03:59pm
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A politician YES a statesman NO
Mr Morsi' decision to bully and challenge the Constitutional High Court should come as no surprise, after all he has appointed himself as a president of Egypt prior to the final count of the votes. Even Mr Moubark has always respected the court when they ruled against him more than once during his presidency. Mr Morsi should realise that in all democratic countries the government of the day usually appoints judges of the same political persuasion which means if he stays in power long enough he will have the opportunity to appoint his own islamist judges, therefore his and his supporters argument about the judges being appointed by the previous regime does not hold water and it is an insult to all free thinking Egyptians.There is no doubt that in this short period of time, we have witnessed a stand over tactic and contemptuous behaviours never seen before from any past Egyptian president. I do not want to be alarmist but I will not be surprised if Mr Morsi's recent trip
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11



Bala
11-07-2012 11:57am
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Morsi must have patience
Morsi is elected president of Egypt and will eventually gain all the constitutional powers bestowed to a president. Egypt is still suffering from the Mubarak rule and the effects of months of revolution. It is most advisable that Morsi should wait for a quicker and fair election to the parliament. Egypt had been home to most liberal and progressive Muslims and the 10% Coptic population lived happily with them. To gain the confidence of the progressive minded Egyptians Morsi would have taken women and Coptic in his ministry and would have waited for new election to the parliament.
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MPA
11-07-2012 02:46pm
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Patience isn't a virtue here
If we are going to wait for the former cronies of Mubarak to share or otherewise give power to the elected bodies, we will be waiting until the next generation. It's been 16 months and both the Military and the HHC have been finding ways to tinker with the law and political court rulings to emasculate the Presidency and keep the Elected Parliament from convening.
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Zaki
11-07-2012 08:11am
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The SCAF and their cronies HCC judges
The HCC judges are are nothing but bunch of oppotunists, and evils. They are old mUbarak regime'c criminal. These judges are helping SCAF to keep a grip on elected parliamentarians. Liberals and Copts are very selfish parties, and siding with SCAF. That is why SCAF got so bold. SCAF has not knowledge and guts to run the country of 85 million Egyptians. US and its cohorts EU wants to keep country divided through the help of illegal NGOs. All foreign elements are working against the state, hence should be kicked out.
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luay
11-07-2012 02:14am
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not yet
where is your new government , Mr President , what does the delay mean ?
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MPA
11-07-2012 02:50pm
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Why does he need your timetable?
Apparently you think he is up to something evil, why don't you share it instead of hiding behind deceitful questions? My guess is that the reason he hasn't appointed a Cabinet, is because there is a question of what kind of authority will they have if his own authority has been diminshed by your brothers in the military. Word has it that they are trying to pull another power scheme on them, like Morocco's king pulled on the new Islamist PM: by ensuring that power brokers, such as the Min of Justice, Min of Defense, Min of Finance and Min of the Interior are appointed and report to the military.
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Democracy Puppit Dance
11-07-2012 01:22am
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How these old generals would be so blinded by power and wealth that they dont see the state of war they have made for the whole nation by choice.
We are the military pharaohs and you are not among us like Hosni Mubarak but a spineless president elected through a process named democratically which we will boot it out in this part of the world. We are the custodians of the power and also has the support from all imperial powers around the world you fool!!!!
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Democacy Puppet Dance
11-07-2012 01:02am
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Shamful for the Military and Tuntavies!!!
We are the military pharaohs and you are not among us like Hosni Mubarak but a spineless president elected through a process named democratically which we will boot it out in this part of the world. We are the custodians of the power and also has the support from all imperial powers around the world you fool!!!! Shamful for the Military and Tuntavies!!!
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Baha
11-07-2012 12:14am
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Power hungry brotherhood
They have lied to the Egyptian people time and time again."we will only run for 30% of the seats in parliament " LIE " the brotherhood won almost 50% of the seat with another 20% going to tha salafist. Islamists control 70% of parliament " We will not field a presidential c candidate" LIE they fielded Shater and when he was disqualified Morsy a last minute substitute replaced him. It was the brotherhoods thirst for power that had the judges rule against them. Mubarak warned Egypt and the world that if we had free elections in Egypt the Islamists would manipulate Egyptians and win the elections. Despite six month of embarrassing incompetence in parliament Egyptians still went to the polls and voted in the brotherhoods substitute candidate. The only thing that stands between Egypt and regime that will not only be dictators they will seek to control what you wear what you drink what you watch on tv what you can do at the beach what part of our amazing history we can be proud of. Inshallah
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MPA
11-07-2012 02:55pm
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The Brotherhood are standing up for Democracy
Your comments are nothing less than inappropriate. The Brotherhood (and the Salafis) are the only ones out their ensuring that the new thing called free elections is kept alive. Meanwhile the liberals, Christians and Secularists have folded over, just as they did with Mubarak. In my opinion, the Islamist are winning the popularity contest and they have the support of the US.
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Colin
11-07-2012 12:05am
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Tennis Court Oath
When Louis XVI tried to dissolve the elected Parliament of the French people in 1789, the members reassembled in a tennis court in the Palace grounds. Even Louis XVI soon conceded that he could not defy the will of the People
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Terence Riley
10-07-2012 10:08pm
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Support for the Pesident and Parliament for Egypt
From here, it is clear. the Egyptian people want a new leader and a new government. Democratically-minded people can disagree about the candidates. But, now, I see the leader of Egypt to be Mohammed Morsi, not the generals . And the legislature is Parliament, not the High Constitutional Court.
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mo
11-07-2012 11:53am
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problem is...you are there
it is clear only because you are there. if you are here, then you would know how the people fighting for democracy here now are the biggest enemies of democracy, just using that name to become political and moral dictators of egypt.
algoritmo
11-07-2012 06:28am
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From here, it is nearly clear
the leader of Egypt IS Mohammed Morsi.
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duglarri
10-07-2012 09:21pm
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To The Tennis Court!
European history, sure, but surely these judges know the history? Closing the doors of the parliament just means that the elected representatives go find the nearest tennis court, as they did in 1789.
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