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Guide: The Challenges Egypt and the Morsi Administration Must Face
Bassem Sabry provides an overview of the political, economic and social challenges facing Egypt's first post-Mubarak president, with an emphasis on the everyday problems facing average Egyptians
Bassem Sabry , Thursday 16 Aug 2012
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Old Cairo
A general view of mosques is pictured before sunset during the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, in Old Cairo (Photo: Reuters)

Mohamed Morsi, Egypt’s first democratically-elected and civilian president, and his divisive choice for prime minister, former irrigation minister Hisham Qandil, have recently settled on their long-awaited choices for the new cabinet, a sizeable 35-strong council of ministers. This new cabinet faces a list of increasingly daunting challenges that face a country still recovering from tumultuous upheaval.

This special guide presents an overview of some of the most critical of these challenges. The focus, however, is more on the everyday life for Egyptians. The guide will avoid discussion of topics such as foreign policy or the influence of the military over political decisions. Rather, the aim is to highlight issues that have received a relatively smaller share of attention in public discourse due to the predominant focus on the democratic transition process and its exceptional and unique difficulties.

The Economy

Subsidies & the Budget

Food Security

Fuel & Electricity Shortages

Overpopulation

Slums & Random Housing

Religious Freedoms, Minorities

Judiciary & Education

The Interior Ministry

Freedom of Speech, Media & the Arts

Tourism

Women's Rights, Street Children

The Public Sector & Privatisation

Corruption

Water

Saving Cairo!

Healthcare & Hepatitis

National Reconciliation



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A note to readers: While statistics contained in this report have been obtained from reputable and/or specialised sources, other estimates or figures may vary, depending on methods of calculation. Even so, the figures remain within the same pertinent range and indications. Also, the guide is not necessarily meant to be read in one sitting. It is designed in a manner that allows for multiple reading sessions. For currency conversions, assume for simplicity that $1 equals LE6.

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Bassem Sabry is a blogger and writer who specializes in Egyptian and Middle Eastern affairs. His work has appeared in Foreign Policy and The Atlantic. He blogs at http://anarabcitizen.blogspot.com/ and can be found on Twitter at @Bassem_Sabry




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Ahmed Abuiliazeed
03-10-2012 05:37pm
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Great Work
Awesome job keep it Up.
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Ahmed Abuiliazeed
03-10-2012 05:35pm
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Great Work
Awesome job keep it Up.
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expat
26-08-2012 08:55pm
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jobs in a praying busy country?
dear cristina dont forget,th biggest party is sponsored by countries,which have nothing else in mind than to turn this egypt in a second wahabi paradise... and in good old islamic countries,its enough to be a warrior,to be respected education,experiences etc only hurts the true believe,keep them stupid and obidient... you will see,how it tunrs out in the end,as the money keeps fowng in expat
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Cristina
21-08-2012 06:08pm
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Where is the unemployment??
Gallup survey conducted in April showed that Egyptians named jobs as the No. 1 issue or challenge that their government should address, regardless of which political party they supported. The general economic situation and security tied for the next most mentioned priorities. Those expressing support for the Muslim Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party, the Salafist-oriented Nour Party, and the relatively liberal and secular Free Egyptians Party all prioritized the same issues the same way. http://www.gallup.com/poll/155732/Egyptians-Government-Focus-Jobs.aspx (I'm spanish, and we have the same problem)
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