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Egyptians mock PM Qandil's electricity rationing advice
Social media is rife with humorous ridicule of Egypt's Prime Minister tips to the public on power conservation urging them to 'wear more cotton' and 'just stay in one room'
Eslam Omar, Saturday 11 Aug 2012
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Qandil
Egypt's new prime minister Hesham Qandil(Photo: AP)

Egyptians retort sarcastically all over social media with comments on Egypt’s newly-appointed Prime Minister Hisham Qandil's announcements regarding the government’s electricity consumption conservation strategy.

"It’s so important to reduce the electricity consumption. This year the rationing is optional but in the long run it will be obligatory," Qandil, the first PM appointed by Muslim Brotherhood’s President Mohamed Morsi, said on Friday in a press conference.

Egypt suffers from an energy shortage this summer, and cutoffs are frequent - almost daily. Business and homes are badly affected, even in the capital, Cairo, and other big cities.

The Egyptian newspaper Al-Masry Al-Youm quotes the Prime Minister in their headline on the press conference: "Qandil demands Egyptians wear cotton clothes and gather in one room to save electricity."

Just minutes after the news spread, Egyptians started to mock Qandil’s statements through the social networks and even hashtagged him in relation to a famous underwear brand, Cottonile on Twitter.

Ahram Online translates and compiles some of the thousands of comments (minus the foul-language):

"Now I know why I am not feeling the renaissance. Of course: it’s because I am wearing polyester," referencing the Muslim Brotherhood's Renaissance project, which was part of their campaign platform. 

“Garbage problem: we should clean, electricity: we should turn off the air conditioners. Does the government have any other problems that people could solve?”

"And what about you and the rest of the ministers? Will you turn off the air conditioners, too?"

"Perfect! We should apply the same rationing system on water, too: let’s shower together."

"Mr PM, thank you for the cotton tip but you didn’t tell us what colour, and does the Brotherhood allow the G-string?"

"Cotton, Qandil? Thank God that the Prime Minister is not Essam El-Erian!"

"All of us with cotton underwear in one room? Sir, what you are asking for is forbidden and unlawful and it shakes the heavens and the earth."

"Wow! Is it permissible in the university, too? Please!"

"The government just reached the peak of ‘transparency’."

"Breaking: Mr Qandil neglects all reports about being a Cottonile fan, insisting ‘I am [a fan of] Dice [another famous Egyptian underwear brand]’"

 "Did he just watch The Danish Experiment [a famous Egyptian movie starred by Adel Emam]? When will we have the nudity day? Brilliant!"

 "My house only has one room, sir!"





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Samir Amman
12-08-2012 06:40pm
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We are all responsible
In response to the mentality that makes fun of, 'Garbage problem: we should clean, electricity: we should turn off the air conditioners' .. yes you should. Almost all Egyptians are responsible for mass littering and severe wasting of power (leaving ACs and PCs on all the time. I know if everyone put just a small effort to help a little then we wouldn't be in this (literal) mess that we're in. Egypt time and time forgets that the change comes from within first, then we see the effects around us. I really wish my fellow countrymen and women would stop being so self-centred and finally unite towards a common cause. Ma3lesh, bokra insh'Allah.
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7



Samir Amman
12-08-2012 06:40pm
0-
0+
We are all responsible
In response to the mentality that makes fun of, 'Garbage problem: we should clean, electricity: we should turn off the air conditioners' .. yes you should. Almost all Egyptians are responsible for mass littering and severe wasting of power (leaving ACs and PCs on all the time. I know if everyone put just a small effort to help a little then we wouldn't be in this (literal) mess that we're in. Egypt time and time forgets that the change comes from within first, then we see the effects around us. I really wish my fellow countrymen and women would stop being so self-centred and finally unite towards a common cause. Ma3lesh, bokra insh'Allah.
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6



KlausLondon
12-08-2012 04:16pm
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What is wrong with conserving energy??
Every time I visit Egypt, I am always amazed how people are wasting energy as if there is no tomorrow. In the Bedouin village on the Sinai where I stay all lights are fully ablaze at noon time, whilst the larger towns, such as Sharm and Dahab are surrounded by thousands of unnecessary street lights, lighting up the largely empty motoways at night. People are even told that they are not using the village generator enough and should switch it on for longer! There is no public transport to speak of, so that people are driving even the shortest distances in pickup trucks that consume about 20l/100km. You see very few solar panels, mainly for mobile telephone transmitters, even though Egypt has no shortage of sun. Maybe the Egyptians should take Mr Qandils advice a bit more seriously....
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5



Karim Dad Dilshad Chughtai
12-08-2012 07:55am
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Egypt is going to be Pakistan
In Pakistan, we have acute shortages of electricity both in terms intensity and frequency. In cities there is hour by hour load shedding, but in villages, more than 20 hour a day. Egyptians are going to suffer the same problems. Moreover, in tribal areas we are fighting with Taliban militants, and the Egyptian Army is busy in eradicating the Jihadi Militants in Sinai peninsula. In these ways Egypt will soon be Pakistan. In addition, we have population explosion with scarce resources, too much American influence in our internal politics, and ever increasing political role of armed forces. Recently when Hillary Clinton visited Egypt, people thronged to the streets of Cairo holding placards that read: "Egypt will never be Pakistan". Now we inform Hillary:" Egypt is going to be Pakistan".
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4



Randolp
11-08-2012 11:54pm
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Cotton
If we wore LESS cotton we would be cooler. A single layer of cotton should suffice.
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Karina Loren
11-08-2012 11:10pm
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almost infamous
Qandils suggestion is embarrassing. He is Egypt's Prime Minister. Of course Egyptians applied their sense of humor to it. That is what always keeps them going. But to think of the idea as a serious suggestion is a serious insult to the Egyptian people. He certainly did not contribute to Egypt's dignity. Why did he make fun of such a serious situation? His approach to the problem has little to do with the gravity and depth of its dimension. What a tragedy.
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Karina Loren
11-08-2012 10:58pm
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almost infamous
Qandils suggestion is embarrassing. He is Egypt's Prime Minister. Of course Egyptians applied their sense of humor to it. That is what always keeps them going. But to think of the idea as a serious suggestion is a serious insult to the Egyptian people. He certainly did not contribute to Egypt's dignity. Why did he make fun of such a serious situation? His approach to the problem has little to do with the gravity and depth of its dimension. What a tragedy.
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1



A woman
11-08-2012 02:25pm
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Wonderful!
Wonderful commends! And all on the point. Something to laugh from full heart in this sad times. P L E A S E - more of this! Thanks folks for your great and never ending Egyptian sense of humor! Maybe this is the only way to 'survive' those politclowns...
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