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'Salafisation' of Al-Azhar condemned
Political groups condemn growing ultra-conservative Salafist influence at Al-Azhar and Ministry of Awqaf, say Egypt should maintain role as 'protector of moderate Islam'
Ahram Online , Friday 7 Sep 2012
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A number of political groups have condemned the growing influence of ultra-conservative Salafists at the Ministry of Awqaf (religious endowments) and Al-Azhar, the most important seat of learning in the Sunni Muslim world.

In a statement issued on Friday, the Popular Movement for the Independence of Al-Azhar, the Free Front for Peaceful Change and the Union of Revolutionary Forces described the appointment of Salafists, mostly from the Building and Development Party – the political arm of Al-Jamaa Al-Islamiya – as deputies at the ministry as an attempt to “divert the path of the Egyptian people who look to Al-Azhar as their religious reference point.”

The groups claimed moderate religious figures at Al-Azhar were being deliberately marginalised and replaced with "extremist" scholars who follow the ultra-conservative Wahhabi school of Islam.

Furthermore, the groups stressed the importance of Egypt maintaining its role as the “protector of moderate Islam” and said it should resist “the importation of foreign ideas,” referring to Wahhabism, which originated in Saudi Arabia.  

A call to demonstrate at the Ministry of Awqaf on Sunday has been issued by the three groups.   





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ADEL ALSHEAR
08-09-2012 09:43am
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ANTI ALZHREEH . ANTI FTAWI ALAZHREH
THIS IS ANTI ALAZHREH . THIS IS ANTI FTWE ALAZHREH .
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Karim
08-09-2012 09:28am
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Salafists go home!
We have to clean egypt from salafists. They have to return to their homeland - Saudi Arabia. Egypt have to protect itself from extremists and Saudi Arabia influence.
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Samantha Criscione
07-09-2012 09:01pm
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To be or not to be: that is the question
This illustrates the method of Ikhwan, as Ikhwan is advised by the Carnegie Institute: the Morsi (Ikhwan) government appointed Mohamed Ibrahim, a Salafist who had whipped up anti-Christian hysteria prior to the New Years days church bombing in 2011, as Minister of Religious Endowments; there was outrage and even a petition immediately from Al Azhar; without ever commenting on the attempted appointment, Morsi simply dropped Ibrahim and appointed someone from Al Azhar to the post; and then, quietly, the Brotherhood stuffs Al Azhar and the Ministry with Salafists. This process is relentless, without possible compromise. The Brotehrhood has its plan, and it was worked out in common with Western powers. Either Egypt's anti-Islamist majority stops brotherhoodization, or people will wake up and discover they have been cooked, and are being served as dinner. There is no in between: to be, or not to be. -- Samantha Criscione
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