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Thursday, 18 October 2018

In letter to NYTimes, Egypt Brotherhood's Shater voices sorrow for slain US diplomats

Writing to the New York Times, Muslim Brotherhood Deputy Guide Khairat El-Shater sends condolences to American people for death of Libya ambassador, condemns Tuesday's breach of embassy grounds in Cairo by Egyptian protesters

Bassem Aly , Friday 14 Sep 2012
Khairat Al-Shater
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"Our condolences to the American people for the loss of their ambassador and three members of the embassy staff in Libya." These words were sent in a letter by Khairat El-Shater, deputy guide of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood, to the New York Times on Friday following the killing of US Ambassador to Libya Christopher Stevens in response to an anti-Islam short film.

Stevens, along with three other embassy staff members, was killed Tuesday night following an attack on the US consulate in Benghazi. Another five Americans and ten members of the Libyan security forces were injured as mobs, allegedly protesting the film, stormed the US mission armed with rocket-propelled grenades.

El-Shater pointed out that he did not hold the American government or its citizens responsible for the acts of "the few" that abuse the right to free expression, despite his displeasure over the continued appearances of such anti-Muslim productions.

El-Shater also condemned the "breach of the US embassy premises" by Egyptian protesters, which he described as illegal under international law.

"Egypt is going through a state of revolutionary fluidity, and public anger must be dealt with responsibly and with caution," the Brotherhood's number-two added. 

On Thursday, the Muslim Brotherhood's official English-language Twitter account (@Ikwanweb) reposted a message from El-Shater, in which he expressed his "relief that none of the US embassy Cairo staff was hurt" and voicing hope that US-Egypt relations would weather the latest developments.

The reconciliatory tweet, however, was posted as the Brotherhood's Arabic-language Twitter account and its official website were both praising the ongoing protests outside the US embassy and calling for a million-man rally on Friday.

One Arabic-language article on the Brotherhood's site sported the headline 'Egyptians rise to defend the Prophet.' Perceiving a contradiction, the embassy tweeted a tart response from its own account: "Thanks. By the way, have you checked out your own Arabic feeds? I hope you know we read those too."

The Brotherhood replied some 20 minutes later, saying, "We understand you're under a lot of stress, but it would be more helpful if you pointed out your exact concern about the Arabic feed."

The brief exchange provided a snapshot into the strains that US-Egypt relations came under this week. It took Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi more than two days to officially condemn the breaching of US embassy grounds by angry protesters.

US President Barack Obama on Wednesday described Egypt as "neither an ally nor an enemy" of the US. "I don't think that we would consider them an ally, but we don't consider them an enemy," Obama said in an interview with Telemundo, excerpts of which were aired by MSNBC.

"And if they [Egypt] take actions that indicate they're not taking those responsibilities, as all other countries do where we have embassies, I think that's going to be a real big problem," the US president added.

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jan
15-09-2012 01:15pm
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for all you lunatics
where were all of you when the islamists broke down the 1500 year old buddha statues in afghanistan. should all the buddhists start killing and bombing all islamic sites and embassies? or only some people are accepted as free to destroy.
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adel
15-09-2012 11:47am
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amazing
I think if Mubark was still in power,he'll give the same speech, Egypt and rest of Arab and Islamic world must push the west to issue Anti-Islam insult prohibition like the one named Anti-Semitic .. it's not acceptable anymore to let the westerners mock Islam and its symbols every 6 months or less under the freedom of speech which they only use against Islam and no one dares there to insult Judaism or Israel
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gid tanner
15-09-2012 05:54pm
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NOT TRUE
You are wrong or intentionally spreading falsehood . In the US anyone can say any and all awful things against Irael , Jews , Christians , or anyn one else . That's the whole point of free speech . We let idiots be idiots , as well as letting more responsible people share ideas .that's why we don't kill people for whatever they say . the only exception is when someone says "let's kill (someone )"
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JP
15-09-2012 11:16am
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who are you kidding?
"Perceiving a contradiction"? Who are you kidding? on one hand praising and encouraging the violence and on the other expressing sorrow and sounding apologetic to the American public is the height of two faced hypocritical attitude. What do you stand for : Violence or peace? One answer and stick with it so the message reaches the masses who may be as confused as the MBHs are.
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mo
15-09-2012 09:56am
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muslims live up to what is shown in the movie
instead of laughing off a ridiculous movie, the followers of the religion of peace really show that they are really what movies like this show them to be, violent, intolerant and claiming to be the only one is correct. is no one seeing the irony here?
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Jungle Girl
14-09-2012 10:14pm
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Understanding
This issue seems so complex. People around the world, in places where freedom of speech is not protected by law, find it difficult to understand that our culture, often, intends to insult. In the U.S., no one has the right to be protected against being offended. Communication is often meant to stir debate, conflict, solidarity, ease and unease; it's meant , really, as a course for dialogue. The movie, said to spurn the violence seen in countries around the world, made by a group of people, in their voice, does not reflect the voice of the many- certainly it does not reflect my own. In fact, personally, the movie was atrocious both in its quality as well as its juvenile writing. The people who made the movie also claimed to be representative of people they are not- an attempt to evoke outrage and violence; nonetheless, reacting in a manner which is not supported by society's laws, like killing and destroying, is a weak, cowardly argument, an excuse to act like savages in the name
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Disappointed
14-09-2012 08:53pm
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Actions speak a thousand words
Religion is meant to unify. So why destroy and murder under the name of religion. Lies are not a justification for murder. And hate and prejudice are not a justification for lies. We need to elevate our behavior no matter what our belief. We need to stop prejudices of any kind and see each other as one. We have the capacity. It is time to arise and seek unity rather than villify one another. It is time that we determine the truth for ourselves and not simply listen to hearsay. Mankind is one. We must unify. We can do it and we must do it now.
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Erasmus
14-09-2012 08:30pm
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A time for rational thought and calm action.
What has happened all over the middle east is tragic and unforgivable. But we cannot punish a country for the actions of its people. We must trust that the Egyptian leaders will take the necessary and proper steps and punish those who breached the compound. If they do not, then we should not over react. Enacting some of the suggestions in the comments would turn world opinion against the United States of America, effectively changing us from a victim to a bully receiving comeuppance. If we are to take action against Egypt, it should not be large and brash. Show the world that we are no longer willing to engage in relations with Egypt, but in a way that can be shown as something different. Something as simple as withdrawing our diplomats and ambassadors. And the incident in Egypt could have been much worse. A German embassy was actually burned down in Sudan, and on 9/11 an American consulate in Libya was killed. That is how they repay our help, by killing our civil servants. T
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musthafa
15-09-2012 06:03am
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But we cannot punish a country for the actions of its people
@ dear Erasmus where were people like you when the people of Iraq and Afganistan are punished for the actions of its leaders. or for that matter people of Afganistan are being killed for the action of one man who is claimed to have been killed. would you attribute same to US administration and citizens?
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harold
14-09-2012 08:02pm
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mr
First, please stop being so ignorant as to think that all Muslims are the same. If that is true, then Terry Jones is typical of all Christians... Second, in most of their countries, any film would have to be approved by the government, so they naturally assume the same is true everywhere. Third, Muslims need to realize that inciting violence was the purpose of the film, and they are stupidly playing the part that was written for them. Clear and unambiguous communication would help a lot, so bigoted rants are counter-productive.
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Norris Stough
14-09-2012 07:51pm
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Egypt should now face consequences of its actions.
The Egyptian government made a cynical decision to allow it's official news media to incite the current unrest for short-term political gain. The Egyptian media fomented this unrest. Since the Egyptian government is in control of the media we can reasonably assume the government approved these inflammatory statements. They should now bear the long-term costs of these actions. Including cancelling the $1.5B aid package and blocking their request for $4.5B in aid from the World Bank. Since it is unsure who is in control of the Egyptian government, all Egyptian assets in the United States should be frozen, their diplomats expelled, and all Egyptian nationals in the United States ordered to leave withing 72 hours or face arrest, detention and deportation. These actions should remain in place until the same mullahs and Egyptian state media representatives who instigated the violence go on Egyptian state median and apologize to the United States and run educational programs explai
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Musthafa
15-09-2012 06:09am
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IT IS FREEDOM OF SPEECH
isn't it freedom of speech to broadcast their opinion? isn't it freedom of expression of the media to broadcast anything withing their regulations. if google refuse to remove the video and the US government does not and cannot take any further action because it violates US constitution how dare you expect egypt government to take action against freedom of expression?
KG
14-09-2012 11:23pm
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It wasn't the official media.
Actually, it has nothing to do with official media. The TV station that aired the movie is a private one(AlNas) and the newspaper that sensationalized the issue was AlYoum AlSabe'(The seventh day). Both are private.
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A woman
14-09-2012 05:43pm
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Talk and action
"Egypt is going through a state of revolutionary fluidity, and public anger must be dealt with responsibly and with caution," the Brotherhood's number-two added... Dear Mr. El Shater, what you say is so right, but oviously talk and action are a completely different pair of shoes for you, especially when it comes to the terminus 'responsibility'. Where is the responsibility of the ruling Freedom and Justice-Party now? AND: You are the number two of the Brotherhood and it was you, who said very clearly, that your (the brotherhood's) main aim is the GLOBAL ISLAMIC STATE , where EVERYBODY has to obey to the Supreme Guide (which is from the Brotherhood of course) and some other nice things (Alexandria speech in April 2011, who is interested can see it also on YOUTUBE)! That tells me enough about your real way of thinking about other religions, cultures and so on. And yes, I understand Arabic too!!!
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Samantha Criscione
14-09-2012 09:13pm
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Touche!
El Shater's pose as a tolerant liberal is stunning. "Global village," indeed! Since 2005, the Carnegie Institute for Peace (or whatever they are actually for) has been tutoring Ikhwan on how to sound like, well, the Carnegie Institute for Peace, hence the global village baloney. And as for El Shater's smarmy expression of concern for proper use of freedom of speech, how about allowing some freedom of speech in Egypt? I seem to recall that Sheikh Wagdy Ghoneim, who is described on Ikhwanweb.org as a Brotherhood leader, called for killing anti-Ikhwan protesters on August 24. --Samantha Criscione
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