Last Update 9:30
Egypt's opposition groups plan demos to 'win revolution's demands'
Coalition of 21 secular political groups call for nationwide demonstrations 12 October for representative constitution, economic improvements and justice for revolutionary 'martyrs'
Ahram Online, Saturday 6 Oct 2012
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1610
Tahrir square
Tahrir square (Photo by Mai Shaheen)

Twenty one secular political parties and groups released a joint statement, Saturday, announcing nationwide protests Friday, 12 October calling for the fulfilment of the "demands of the revolution," including a consensual constitution that reflects the diversity of Egyptian society.

The participants include the Constitution Party (headed by opposition figure Mohamed ElBaradie), April 6 Movement Democratic Front, the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, Al-Tagammu Party and the Popular Current (led by eliminated presidential contender Hamdeen Sabbahi).

The secular coalition believes that the Muslim Brotherhood and Salafist parties are pushing to achieve Islamist political hegemony and turn Egypt into a theocratic state.

Consequently the main demand of Friday's demonstrations is a representative constitution, particularly at a time when Islamist and liberal members of Egypt's Constituent Assembly continue to fight over articles related to religion and freedom of expression in Egypt's national charter.

Key economic demands are also listed in the joint statement, including the implementation of a minimum monthly wage of LE1500 and a maximum wage of LE22,500,  government control over rising prices and the repatriation of funds illegally accumulated and transferred overseas by former regime figures.

The group is also calling on President Mohamed Morsi's administration to stop incurring debts from foreign countries, adding that there are "alternative sources of funding that the government can depend on." $4.8 billion loan talks between Egypt and the International Monetary Fund are set to resume at the end of October.  

In addition, the coalition is demanding that the government fight corruption, rampant unemployment (which has reached 12 per cent) and the deterioration of the education and health care system.

They also insist that the executive body deal with the issue of the country's slums and "purge" governmental bodies and institutions (especially those related to security and media).

Although former president Hosni Mubarak and his interior minister Habib El-Adly were sentenced to life for "failing to protect civilians" during the January 25 Revolution, no member of Egypt's security forces has been charged.

Consequently the 21 parties and groups are demanding that those responsible for "killing and torturing thousands of Egyptian revolutionaries since the uprising began" face trial.

They are also calling on the government to "honour" the revolutionaries who were killed and injured and release the remaining "8 April officers", who were imprisoned after joining protests against the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces last year.  

The ongoing crisis in the Sinai Peninsula is also an issue the parties raised. They demand a "clear plan to control" the growing militant problem in the border region.

The 21 political parties and groups that have announced their participation in the protests are: The National Commission for Change, the Democratic Revolutionary Coalition, the Egyptian Socialist Party, the Egyptian Communist Party, Socialist Popular Alliance Party, Al-Tagammu Party, Labours and Farmers Party, the Popular Democratic Movement, the Mina Daniel Movement, the National Coalition for Fighting Corruption, Revolutionary Popular Movement (January), The Egyptian Popular Current, Constitution Party, Egyptian Social Democratic Party, April 6 Movement (Democratic Front), Revolution Youth Union, Free Front for Peaceful change, Coalition of Female Organisations, Egyptian Innovation Front, Revolutionary Forces Coalition and the National Committee for Defending Freedom of Speech.  





Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
5



Omar Hefny
09-10-2012 12:10pm
0-
0+
too much division
The secular camp, (which i fully belong to), is clearly a minority. Yet, they manage to be divised in 21 parties and coalitions!! we still didn't learn from our past mistakes...We need to forget our differences (leftist/liberals) and focus on not turning egypt into a theocratic state...Unite and work in the ground with the poor people in the street or else face defeat again in the next elections.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
4



Seham
08-10-2012 11:29pm
8-
4+
21 October protest
The leaders of this protest their problem that think that they are the smartest however most of Egyptians can read them and know what is real reason for this protest Any wise person knows that Revolution demands can not be fulfilled in 3 months or even three years but at least we need to see some improvement and work towards fulfilling those demands Do you think damage over 30 years can be reformed that fast even if the president promised or has hoped We should be wise And Iam asking the leaders who has a program and plan to reform the country if he will the president why do not you start your programs for the poor if you are really care for them not for the chair Why you do not help to improve rather than talking and tweeting and why you putting a condition to provide great projects Only if you are elected who really wants to help he can help now and before election.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



mumby
07-10-2012 02:09pm
7-
7+
Don't just rely on idea
Many secularist, leftist and liberal in muslim countries have idea which were never tested on the ground reality. They should justify their ideas in reality first rather than force other parties to do it. They should respect democratic process.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Nora
07-10-2012 08:46am
2-
10+
21 groups, do we really need all of them!!
In a country that has more than 50% illiterates and 80% are considered poor, do we really need 21 groups and parties. Why can't we united to work, and volunteer to educate our people on basic tools and technologies. It is clear that Hamdeen and Baradie are in need of a job. At any rate, I am happy that Baradie is taking it to the street. Tweeting is getting kind of boring.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



Hesham Agag
06-10-2012 11:54pm
3-
4+
Revolution is still going on
Many Egyptians have illusions that Revolution is finished. It is not true. Change needs time and people who stick to the positive.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
A.K.
08-10-2012 02:20am
0-
10+
Revolution OR Democratic Channels to Introduce Change?
Thank you for the interesting comment. I think the citizens of Egypt have now the established democratic channels to implement the necessary changes for a better life to all. The Revolution triggered the change of regime and the introduction of true democracy. Now is the time for a peaceful transition from old ideas and policies to new ideas and creative policies with full respect to the Law. I admired the Revolution but if Revolution means block Cairo's main streets, stop the government functioning, prevent people going to work and earn their living and disturb the law and order, I suggest to forget it as it is damaging the country; instead go join or form a party to articulate your ideas and gain public support, focus your energy on winning the majority in Parliament at the next election so you can implement your ideas. Please be aware no offence is intended by my comments.

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising