Last Update 15:13
'Secularists' carry a foreign agenda: Salafist Imam tells pro-Sharia protesters
Mohamed El-Soghyr accuses 'secularists' and liberals of fronting for western interests; the former member of parliament said those who oppose Sharia resemble 'infidels' who fought against the prophet Mohamed
Randa Ali, Friday 9 Nov 2012
Share/Bookmark
Views: 1811


Tahrir Thousands at Tahrir to demand implementation of Islamic Sharia law 9 Nov, 2012 (Photo: Mai Shaheen)
Leading member of the Salafist Building and Development Party Mohamed El-Soghyr (Photo: snapshot of
Thousands at Tahrir to demand implementation of Islamic Sharia law 9 Nov, 2012 (Photo: Mai Shaheen)

Sheikh Mohamed El-Soghyr, member of Al-Gamaa Islamyia, opens fire at "seculars" and liberals at Friday prayer ceremony in Tahrir Square, accusing them of being agents to the West.

"Our Prophet [Mohamed] fought the infidels of Mecca, who are now represented by the Liberals," said El-Soghyr.

The former member of now-disbanded People's Assembly from the Salafist Building and Development Party spoke before several thousands who gathered in the square to demand Egypt's new constitution to be based on the Islamic Sharia law.

El-Soghyr added that it was unacceptable for Egypt, "the beating heart of Islam", to be a place for those who are only concerned with their own interest and agendas.

These "seculars" and liberals do not believe in the things they call for – like democracy, they only believe in orders that are sent to them through mediators for the West, claimed El-Soghyr.

El-Soghyr claimed that it was "God's will" of granting Muslims' wish for a president who is representative of Egyptians and one that will rule by Islamic Sharia law, referring to the Muslim Brotherhood President Mohamed Morsi.

"We are still waiting for more, and will not blink until the law of God is applied. This is a wish we have for so long pursued," the Salafist Imam said.

He further stated that their protest is a "duty towards the book of God [Quran]."

El-Soghyr continued his speech by urging Muslims who claim their belief In "Allah and his prophet" to give into his laws, questioning if "there is a better law-maker than God?"

"If I am questioning the laws and revelations of the God I am worshipping, then I better find myself another god," he added.

The Imam called for the dismissal of the Prosecutor General, criticised the High Constitutional Court and accused some judges of accepting bribes.

El-Soghyr further called for the release of the blind Sheikh, Omar Abdel Rahman, who is serving a life sentence in the US for his alleged part in terrorist attacks in 1993.

Prayers ended with protesters playing on the main chant of the 25 January revolution, crying out "Bread, Freedom, Islamic Sharia," substituting the "Islamic doctrine" for "social justice," in the original chant.

Friday's protest was called for by several Islamist groups, including Al-Gamaa Islamyia and the Salafist Front.

Notably, both the Muslim Brotherhood and Salafist Al-Nour party, Egypt's biggest Islamist groups announced their non-participation.





Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
7



Nora
10-11-2012 08:20pm
13-
16+
Go ahead and 'dislike' that!!!
Those who demonstrated last Friday are residents of Egypt. Like it or not, they are entitled to their rights of free expression. Freedom is not a monopoly for the west and their agents.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
6



M V L
10-11-2012 01:27pm
7-
19+
Politics and religion
It has been proven that politics and religion do not mix in advancing societies. Once so called religious people start talking politics the agenda changes and their purpose becomes power not well being of the people. Why is it so hard to understand that religion serves ultimately as a path to enlightenment and is a means to an end not an end in itself. Keep religion out of the realm of politics and try to move forward instead of back to the dark ages. One more thing.... stop imagining conspiracies everywhere and take responsibility for your own state of affairs both on the human and societal level.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ansari
12-11-2012 09:01am
5-
2+
Politics is part of Islamic religion
MVL, It has been proven that politics and religion do mix in advancing societies. Your Coptic Christianity does not offer a religion that encopasses politics. Islam covers every aspect of and governance. It has been tested and implemented hundreds of years. Are you livivg in the dark. The West took their democracy and law from Quran. US constitution derived from Quarn by Thomas Jefferson, architect of US constitution. Wake up and smell the coffe yoy ignorant.
5



Ramy the Egyptian
09-11-2012 11:50pm
4-
20+
Other Way Around
Actually, it's the other way around: YOU are the ones carrying a foreign agenda! Your ideas are not even Egyptian! I bet that if you look at these people's history, you will find that most of them are Saudi, Emirati, Qatari, Yemeni.. Egyptians are not ultraconservative extremist Islamist! Yes, they are religious, but moderate and liberal by nature!
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ansari
12-11-2012 09:06am
5-
2+
Islam is the only way for Egypt to get back dignity from the West.
Ramy, go fly a kite. There are no Saudi, Emirati, Qatari, Yemenis in Egypt in any significant number. You are just making it up. All Egyptian Muslims want Sharia, and hence will get it. You eat your hear out. Beat your chest in disappointment.
4



freedomfighter
09-11-2012 09:55pm
4-
12+
so what
what will change in Egypt if they make Islamic state? will the lives of the poor be changed? will Egypt become a rich and respected state?
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



Egyptian
09-11-2012 08:33pm
3-
21+
Carrying foriegn agendas?
He's accusing secularists of carrying foreign agendas? Did he not notice the dozens of Saudi Arabian flags being waved by his supporters?
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Manchester Man
09-11-2012 04:11pm
13-
5+
Democracy
Democracy is so beautiful. Seeing opposing forces protest on the streets is priceless for any democracy. I am neutral by the way as I am not Egyptian. The will of the people should decide. To those who criticise ANY protesters, they are anti-democratic
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Egyptian
09-11-2012 08:34pm
2-
8+
Wrong
Anyone has the right to criticize protests, but no one has the right to prevent a protest.
1



Manchester Man
09-11-2012 04:11pm
1-
2+
Democracy
Democracy is so beautiful. Seeing opposing forces protest on the streets is priceless for any democracy. I am neutral by the way as I am not Egyptian. The will of the people should decide. To those who criticise ANY protesters, they are anti-democratic
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising