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Egypt opposition groups announce plans to march on presidential palace
Political forces opposed to President Morsi's November decree and draft constitution say they will stage peaceful march to presidential palace on Tuesday
Ahram Online, Sunday 2 Dec 2012
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Morsi
President Mohammed Morsi speaks to supporters outside the Presidential palace in Cairo,23 November (Photo: Reuters)

Several Egyptian political parties and groups have issued a joint statement announcing their intention to peacefully march to the presidential palace in Cairo at 5pm on Tuesday to voice opposition to President Mohamed Morsi's recent decisions and the date that has been set for a nationwide popular referendum on Egypt's draft constitution.

"The constitution project that Morsi wants to put before a referendum is in fact a project for tying down the political, civil, social and economic freedoms of Egyptians," read the statement, published on the Egyptian Popular Current's official Facebook page.

The statement went on to question the draft charter's constitutionality, stressing its rejection of the date set – 15 December – for the upcoming referendum.

Egypt's High Constitutional Court had been expected to issue a ruling on the constitutionality of Egypt's Constituent Assembly (which wrote the draft constitution), but the ruling was postponed indefinitely after large numbers of pro-Morsi protesters gathered outside the court's downtown headquarters on Sunday.

Groups opposed to Morsi, which have been occupying Cairo's Tahrir Square for over two weeks, accuse the president of working in the interests of the Muslim Brotherhood and its Freedom and Justice Party.

"This is a final warning to Mohamed Morsi, who was democratically elected president: his policies, which favour his party and group, will cause the dissolution of his legitimacy," read the statement.

On Saturday, despite continued protests against Morsi's recent constitutional decree, which protects the Constituent Assembly from legal challenge, the president announced that the draft constitution would be put before a nationwide referendum in two week's time.

The statement was signed by eighteen political parties and groups, including the Constitution Party, the Egyptian Social Democratic Party, the Free Egyptians Party, the National Front for Justice and Democracy, the 6 April youth movement, the Democratic Front and the Kefaya movement.

Anti-Morsi forces have threatened for several days to march on the presidential palace in Heliopolis if constitutional declaration was not withdrawn.

Veteran journalist Abdel-Halim Qandil, a fierce critic of the president, and the Mubarak regime before the revolution, has called in a tweet "on the judges, workers, and underground metro drivers to strike and to march on the presidential palace" to defeat the president's decrees.

Many judges, who are on strike against the decree, have already threatened not to monitor the referendum if the president did not rescind his decisions.

Meanwhile, shortly after the president finished his speech on Saturday night calling for a vote on the draft constitution, Mohamed El-Beltagy, the Muslim Brotherhood main operative in the Constituent Assembly, called on the opponents of the draft to fight it - if they disagreed with it - by mobilising a NO vote not to protest.

El-Beltagy, a leading member also in the Brotherhood's Freedom and Justice Party, told Ahram Online that if the opposition defeats the draft at the referendum set for 15 December, a new Constituent Assembly will be chosen via direct elections.





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Nora
05-12-2012 06:03am
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Morsi and the anti three musketeers [do, or die]
Morsi is facing his toughest time yet, December 15th is a do-or-die for his three enemies. 1. The floules have no options but to fight the constitution, as their political life would end on Dec. 16, some would go to jail directly. 2. The sore losers {Sabbahi, ElBaradei, and Mousa}, or self-made revolutionary characters, on Dec 16 there will be no new presidential election. I am hoping they will pick golfing or playing cards as hobby. 3. The Coptic block, which aligned itself with the anti Islam movement; I hope that they have a plan B. Morsi has been extremely cordial with the church, Egyptian Muslims grew up mingling with Christians. There is a need to re-set the relation after the upcoming election. For the rest of us, we can change the constitutions with 20% of the parliament, at latter time.
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6



Nikos Retsos
03-12-2012 03:08pm
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Egypt opposition groups announce plans to march on presidential palace
Thank you all comment writers here for the positive views of Mr. Morsi. He is a nationalist Egyptian like Gamal Abdel Nasser who tries to restore Egypt as a free and pivotal state in the Arab world. In a historical context, Mr. Mursi is another Hugo Chavez - the anti-Western Venezuelan president, and as all public anti-Chavez protests in Venezuela were instigated and funded by the Western powers, so are the anti-Morsi protests in Egypt. The colonial era is over, but colonialism is not. In the colonial era, the colonialists used their own forces and local drafted mercenaries to control their colonies. Now they use puppet regimes - like Mubarak or Hamid Karzai, or indigenous tyrants - that was Aristotle's definition- like those in the Gulf autocractic states. Mr. Morsi deserve the support of all Egyptians because he is not a stooge of any foreign power or Israel, and he is making history for Egypt that Egyptians have been waiting 32 years for! Nikos Retsos, retired professo
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5



zack
03-12-2012 02:36pm
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The opposition and democracy.
Opposition leader of Egypt should understand about democracy. Let the people of the Great Egypt decide trough ballot. Egyption is very civilised and educated.
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4



Nana
03-12-2012 01:10pm
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What kind of schedule is that?
Who will protest at 5 PM? Wake up Liberals people are working or in the Traffic. And you want to run the country??? How??
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3



mumby
03-12-2012 04:34am
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Bad to opponant
Opposition in Egypt never satisfied even they have right to vote,got press,invited to constitution draft and so on.They dream illusive liberty that exceed what is in many democracy countries and dream power even they have no majority say.
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2



Bara El Hadidi
02-12-2012 06:43pm
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Yes vote
Every step the opposition make toward the presidential palace would mean an increase in YES vote in the referendum.
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Ali
02-12-2012 05:54pm
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Why aftraid of ballot...?
Yes,the best and most civil & democratic easiest way to overturn the proposed constitution and constituent assembly is make it through ballot.If opposition think they represent the majority of the egyptions then why aftraid of ballot..? If you are not willing to face the ballot then people will rightly think that your protest is not on any principl or grounds...just to for vested interests to destablize the country nothing else.
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MPA
03-12-2012 03:59pm
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More...
I was cut off for some reason. What I was finishing to say was that they know that they can't win so they think that they can protest enough to force him to step down like they did Mubarak, but Mubarak was not a freely elected leader.
MPA
03-12-2012 03:58pm
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That's just it, they don't want the polls
They know for all of their protests and marches, it is has never amounted to a victory. The closest victory that they have had was when the courts forced the Brotherhood's primary guy from running for the President and Morsi was the alternative. They still couldn't beat him.
Nazeer Ataullah
03-12-2012 12:08pm
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You are right
Work / protest Democraticallay. Ballot Box decides not threats or slogans.
Basheer
03-12-2012 10:15am
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Well said....
Well said, just my thoughts. If the Opposition wants to show their muscle then they can mobilise the masses towards a NO vote in the referendum. Seems to me that the opposition is driven by Mubarak loyalist who want the Mubarak era Egypt back.

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