Last Update 22:36
VIDEO: Mass protests reach Egypt's presidential palace, police withdraw
Central Security Forces withdraw from the mass protests into the presidential palace in Heliopolis
Zeinab El Gundy, Tuesday 4 Dec 2012
Share/Bookmark
Views: 6561
Presidential Palace
Egyptian protesters carry national flags and chant anti Muslim Brotherhood slogans during a demonstration in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, Egypt, Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2012 (Photo: Reuters)

Ahram Online declares its full support for the strike action undertaken on Tuesday by a large number of major Egyptian newspapers and TV stations in defence of freedom of the press, freedom of expression, civil liberties and the rule of law. In view of our particular status as a web-based news outlet, however, we will maintain our updates throughout this crucial day of protest, not in contravention of the strike action, but in full solidarity with it. These decisions were consensually adopted by an all-staff meeting of Ahram Online, and in consultation with members of the board of the Press Syndicate and striking news media.

Security forces have withdrawn from the perimeter outside the presidential palace after receiving orders to go inside the palace.

Some protesters cheered the Central Security Forces (CSF) units after the end of the clashes, according to some news reports. The ministry of interior already issued an official statement declaring that President Morsi left the presidential palace after finishing a couple of meetings on Tuesday. It also added that the security forces practiced self-restraint after the protesters breached the barbed wire cordons around the palace.  

A planned protest at the presidential palace was met with tear gas fired by security forces earlier on Tuesday evening, after protesters, chanting loudly against the constitutional declaration and the draft constitution, tried to remove the barbed wire security barriers, with others launching fireworks. The Central Security Forces responded by drumming their armour with sticks and firing sound bombs and tear gas grenades.

Later, the security forces retired to around one kilometre away, with protesters chanting, "The people want to topple the regime," and "We will not leave, he will leave." 

According to Al-Arabiya news network's account on Twitter, ten people were injured in the clashes between protesters and police forces.

Thousands of protesters had gathered in front of the presidential palace on Tuesday afternoon, chanting against the draft constitution and Constituent Assembly and holding banners saying "We reject splitting the country in two using religion," and "We reject the constitutional declaration."

Rallies made up of thousands of protesters marched from the mosques of Al-Nour and Rabaa Al-Adawaiya in Abbassiya and Nasr City respectively, heading to the presidential palace a few kilometres away.

Protesters chanted: "To those who wonder what the solution is, the Brotherhood has to be dissolved," and "Get out of your houses and come tell Morsi to leave."

Another rally from Ain Shams University merged with the Rabaa Al-Adawaiya rally.

Slogans chanted by the protesters included "Freedom, freedom," "Revolution until victory," and "Down with the Supreme Guide [of the Muslim Brotherhood]" while waving Egyptian flags. Protesters also waved flags displaying the faces of slain protesters, including Sheikh Emad Effat who died during clashes with the military police and protesters during the December 2011 sit-in, and Siyad Belal, a Salafist activist who was tortured to death in 2010 under former president's Mubarak's rule.

Protesters also held banners saying: "No to the constitution" in reference to the draft constitution, which will be subject to a referendum on 15 December.

Tight security measures were taken in Heliopolis in the morning. "They are even tighter than in the days of Mubarak when it comes to the fences. The security forces have already put up barriers in order to ensure that the rallies of Al-Nour Mosque and Rabaa Al-Adawaiya Mosque do not meet," Mahmoud Salem, a leading member of the Free Egyptians Party, told Ahram Online.

Tuesday evening also witnessed protests in Alexandria, Mansoura , Mahalla, Hurghada, Luxor, Assiut, Minya and Ismailia against the draft constitution and constitutional declaration. According to activists, thousands of protesters took the street in Alexandria in huge rallies.

Palace





Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
3



Mohammed
05-12-2012 05:47am
0-
0+
This is so funny
I had one qeution only if mubark still in power you will do the same please just be fair with ur self before u anwser
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Mohammed
05-12-2012 05:34am
0-
0+
Our Egypt first
Let him work stop fight be nice thats the freedom
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



Ishaq
05-12-2012 02:09am
0-
0+
show what u want through referendum
If they really don't like the draft constitution why don't they show it through referendum. Thats how civilized people will do instead of demonstrating
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising