Last Update 19:58
Egypt opposition forces unite in Tahrir and at presidential palace
Opposition forces rally together in Tahrir Square as others join thousands-strong march on presidential palace to denounce President Morsi's 22 November decree and draft constitution
Sarah El-Rashidi, Tuesday 4 Dec 2012
Share/Bookmark
Views: 4570
AL- Atehadeya palace
Photo for protesters at AL- Atehadeya palace trying to remove the Barbed wire (Photo: Mai Shaheen)

Prior to the constitutional referendum slated for 15 December, thousands of protesters gathered in Cairo's Tahrir Square Tuesday to express their unhappiness with Egypt's draft constitution and President Mohamed Morsi's controversial 22 November constitutional declaration.

Morsi's constitutional declaration made the president's decisions impervious to judicial challenge and protects the Islamist-dominated Shura Council (the upper house of Egypt's parliament) and Constituent Assembly (which wrote the new constitution) from dissolution by court order.

"Everything in the current constitution has been carefully constructed to serve Morsi and the Muslim Brotherhood's agenda," said Nahid Rouchdy, a political activist who also works in tourism. She went on to point out that, under the terms of the draft constitution, Egypt's democratically elected Shura Council would be able to pass any law that it wanted.

Rouchdy noted Morsi's authority to appoint and dismiss anyone in government, as had been the case in the Mubarak era. The activist, in her fifties, also pointed to a clause that was removed from the draft constitution that bars the creation of political parties that have religious associations.

"Many of the clauses in the articles aren't clear and are thus open to interpretation. I urge all Egyptians to read it thoroughly," said Rouchdy, whose young daughter has been participating in the ongoing Tahrir Square sit-in for the past 12 days.

Cheers, cries and prayers could be heard on Tuesday as thousands of people converged on the capital's iconic square. Many voiced their intention to stay in Tahrir to ensure that it was not infiltrated by the Muslim Brotherhood and to avoid clashes with police. 

Individuals from all walks of life took part in Tuesday's demonstration, which coincided with a strike by Egyptian journalists, who marched from their syndicate headquarters to Tahrir Square. Many tourism sector workers also staged protests in the square.

"We're here today protesting against the draft constitution, which does not mention tourism," said Rasha Bashir, a human resources manager at one of Egypt's leading tourism companies. According to Riham Hussein, the manager of a diving centre in Sharm Al-Sheikh, similar demonstrations are currently being held in Sharm.

"We would rather die like human beings with our rights intact than as slaves to another corrupt system! I came back from France last week to be part of this," shouted Ghada Salem, a member of Egypt's Green Party.

Ahram Online met others like Salem who had flown back to Egypt from abroad to take part in this week's demonstrations.

Tahrir's central stage gave a platform to many Morsi critics, who voiced their demands and instigated chants denouncing the president and the Muslim Brotherhood.

"I voted for you Morsi and you betrayed us! Forget our freedoms with the Brotherhood," said one man via megaphone.

Others expressed disappointment with the government's performance to date, highlighting Egypt's deteriorating economy, health and education sectors.

"Morsi got money from Saudi but did nothing to develop the country. I don't go to school as it has become too expensive," said 12-year-old Mohamed Ahmed Sabit.

"I have three girls and I can't look after them," exclaimed Ahmed Metwalli, a foule and taamaya vendor. "Food has become too expensive."

While protests in Tahrir Square continued throughout the day, a thousands-strong march to the presidential palace – called for by Egypt's National Salvation Front after Morsi announced the date for the upcoming referendum – began at 5pm. The front was recently established by prominent reform campaigner Mohamed ElBaradei and former presidential candidates Hamdeen Sabbahi and Amr Moussa.

As the nationwide protests reached a crescendo on Tuesday it remained unclear how the political impasse would be resolved, with the constitutional referendum less than two weeks away.

Some political analysts say the only way to resolve the deadlock is to call off the referendum and establish a committee of independent figures and international experts to revise contentious draft articles, while simultaneously establishing a "more representative" Constituent Assembly to address the amended constitution. Analysts, however, remain doubtful that such amendments will be made.





Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
7



Amr
05-12-2012 12:29pm
0-
0+
Futile opposition
The opposition to Mursi doesn't want a referendum. doesn't want a constitution, doesn't wan't an elected parliament, doesn't want an independen't jucuary. They just want to foster anarchy and choas in order to trigger a military coup,
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
6



El Attar
05-12-2012 03:48am
0-
0+
Accountability
you can not judge a man until you wake a couple of miles in his shoes Then give the elected president to the first time in the Egyptian history time to at least kill the corruption that destroyed the country for too long and if he did achieve that goal of killing the corruption then he is out reminding all of us corruption is the cancer preventing the development of our lovely country
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
5



Jehad
04-12-2012 10:57pm
19-
11+
Sgyptian liberals are fascists
Egyptianliberals are more authoritarian and dictatorial than the fascists.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
4



PokingPixies
04-12-2012 09:39pm
8-
15+
Hope Things Get Better!!!!!!
I have no right to say anything about the problems with government you have because it does not effect me or change the way I live, but I do know you have reason in this cause or why be at a sit in for 12 days for nothing.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
3



ChasL
04-12-2012 08:47pm
19-
10+
Egypt has 80+ million citizens
Just like the protesters that brought down Mubarak, these vocal minority is taking away 80+ million Egyptian citizen democratic rights. It was never democratic at all, when these protest destablizes functioning society, disrupts the stability that gaurantees 80 million people's fundamental rights to safety and prosperity. The facts that came in light about foreign funding of Egypt's domestic politics further brings illegitmacy of these destructive protest by the few that never furthered democracy for the 80 million Egyptian. The is a complete shame.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Ahmed
04-12-2012 08:24pm
32-
14+
Show your protest through Ballot
Why don't you register your protest through ballot on 15th December by casting NO vote ? What do you want to achieve through these demonstration or seiging the president palace..? Your prostest would make sense if you had not other choice to make the constitution null & void. Through ballot you not only can reject the constitution draft but also the constituent assembly.If you fear that majority will not support your stance then you are not democratic people if you don not respect the majority mandate.Usually Islamist are blamed and lebeled as un-democratic,voilent and tend to impose their will on people by force but what world is experiance in egypt totally different. Islamists seems more democratic while liberal and seculars are avoiding democratic means and ways.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
ABU SAIF
05-12-2012 11:30am
0-
0+
Islamics Democratic EDA EDA EDA
seems Democracy went out window when the Goverment voted in all the constatution in 19 hours thats 12 minutes spent on each item
Wake up
05-12-2012 05:57am
0-
0+
Don't Vote
If you go vote the brotherhood already won. The brotherhood has manipulated the Egyptian people since the beginning .I am so proud of my Egyptian brothers and sisters for not falling for their most recent power grab. They have lied to the Egyptian people from day one. First we are only running for 30% of the seats in parliament . They won 50% and the Nouri party won another 20%. Then we aren't running for president . First Shater then the back up Morsey. Now we are doing this to preserve the revolution. Enough lies enough manipulation. Enough using rour great religion as a weapon a tool to attain power against the people not for the people.
1



Muhammad Kassim
04-12-2012 07:51pm
19-
17+
Fear of Majority Voice
Why fear of putting the draft for vote? Let Egyptians vote to approve or not to approve the draft constitution. Let's respect the majority and let their voice being heard and honored.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising