Last Update 14:43
Tuesday to see rival constitution protests in Cairo
Mass protests from both opponents and supporters of Egypt's President Morsi will take place in northern Cairo on Tuesday; Ahram Online lays out each group's aims and plans for the day
Ahram Online, Tuesday 11 Dec 2012
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Palace
A soldier pulls barbed wire on a fence to close the road before a demonstration, in front of the presidential palace in Cairo, December 4, 2012 (PhotoL Reuters)

Both opponents and supporters of President Mohamed Morsi will take to the streets on Tuesday to make their voices heard about Saturday's constitutional referendum. Ahram Online provides a brief summary of each side's goals for the day and a map of various marching routes.

Islamists mobilise for yes vote

According the Muslim Brotherhood's official web presence, Ikhwanweb, two main million-man marches are set to take place in Cairo on Tuesday to voice their support for "legitimacy."

Joining the protests are the Egyptian Board of Trustees of the Revolution, a group led by Salafist preacher Safwat Hegazy, and the Islamist Coalition, which is formed of 10 parties and forces affiliated with political Islam.

The protest is further calling on people to vote 'yes' in the constitution referendum.

However, the Salafist Nour Party, one of the members of the coalition, announced that they will not be taking part in the rallies, to have more time to mobilise the street for a 'yes' vote in the referendum on Saturday "to ensure an exit from the current phase to stability."

"We're currently touring all governorates, holding campaigns to interact with the public," Mohamed Mansour, a member of the high commission of the Nour Party told state-owned news agency MENA.

Islamists protesters are expected to assemble at Rabaa Al-Adawiya mosque and Al-Rashdan mosque, both in Nasr City, a northern suburb of Cairo.

Protests are scheduled to converge at a common venue which will be later determined by groups, "depending on certain circumstances."

Brotherhood spokesman Mahmoud Ghozlan told Ahram's Arabic website that the protesters have no intention of marching to the presidential palace, where dozens are holding a sit-in to denounce the referendum and the president's recent declaration.

Last Wednesday the Muslim Brotherhood called on its members to head to the palace to "peacefully" support the president's decisions, while opponents of the president were present at the same place.

Morsi supporters reportedly attacked the sit-in, leading to bloody clashes that left at least eight dead.

The Islamist group has claimed that the majority of those killed were members of the Brotherhood.

Muslim Brotherhood members in Upper Egypt, including Wadi Gedid, Assiut, Sohag, Qena, Luxor, and Aswan are also calling for mass protests at the Omar Makram mosque in the governorate of Assiut.

Opposition rallies supporters

Meanwhile, the presidential palace, which is around three miles away from the pro-Morsi rallies, will receive six opposition marches on Tuesday.

Marches that will leave at 4pm from Al-Nour mosque in Abbasiya, from Hadayek Al-Kobba close to Heliopolis in northern Cairo, from Al-Higaz Square in Upper Heliopolis, from Al-Anwar Al-Mohamediya mosque in Matariya suburb next to Heliopolis, and from Zaki Hussein Street in Nasr City.

The opposition are protesting the referendum on what they describe as an "unrepresentative constitution", which was drafted by an Islamist-led Constituent Assembly; they also object to the taxes rises on certain goods that were announced on Sunday but suspended several hours later by the presidency pending "further study."

"President Morsi is turning into a dictator. His speeches are fragile, not to mention that he has accused the opposition of being foreign agents," read the statement signed by several political forces, including the Socialist Popular Alliance, the Egyptian Popular Current, the Revolutionary Socialists and the Constitution Party.





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7



Ameenah Aly, Free Egypt
11-12-2012 02:36pm
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Dark FOrces
the COnstitution must protect liberty and our human rights. If not, Egypt will be out of UN and become like Iran as a failed society not recognized by the world. We have international obligations.
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6



Shakeel
11-12-2012 02:15pm
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Referendum
The President is asking you to register your choice, what is wrong with that? If you think the constitution is not representative of all Egyptians vote "no", why stall the entire transition?
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5



Sheriff
11-12-2012 01:14pm
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Shame
The extreme bias against mursi and his supporters is so clear a blind man can see. These election losers and their supporters among the mubarak regime remnants have no shame! I wonder why they cannot accept the peooples statement innthe referendum.
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4



Qazi Shafiq
11-12-2012 11:56am
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support
Allah has given a chance to Egipytion to implement His law on His earth after years hardships and sacrifice.All islamoist are waiting for this new revolution ,far awaited.
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3



Bubbly
11-12-2012 08:38am
47-
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Media War
“Morsi supporters reportedly attacked the sit-in, leading to bloody clashes that left at least eight dead. The Islamist group has claimed that the majority of those killed were members of the Brotherhood ““ How much Egyptian media is biased, partial, unprofessional and anti-Islamist one can easily judge from above two sentences of this reporting piece of Ahram. This is purely a provocation from the media to ignite the main stream sentiments of the Egyptian society . The worst part of such bias reporting from Ahram operating on public money. They only can see Poro Morsy supporters attacking opposition but become blind when Islamist being killed, attacked, tortured and their offices property are burnt by so called secular & their new allies of Mubarak remnants. They only report as “MB or FJP claims”. This kind of biased media campaign only ignite the sentiments of the masses to storm these so called media houses that actually become houses of lies and propaganda against Islamist.Very
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Nazeer
11-12-2012 03:18pm
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Unfair Media
I very much agree with you. Most problems ignites by provocative reporting of media. Media has created unsensible, reactionary readers. Media should play fair, constructive role for a stable Egypt.
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Jamna
11-12-2012 05:44am
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dishonest baradei
If Baradei's attitude is adopted, Egypt will never get its constitution...the CA was formed democratically. No one can say the draft constitution is representative of all Egyptians untul the result of referendum is obtained.
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abdul rahman malaysia
13-12-2012 03:01am
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The Voice of Majority Is Supreme
strange that baradei does not respect the egytian constitutional process. The opposition shouls go vote. In the event the constitutional document is accepted by the majority, respect the choice of the majority. If he is still unhappy keep on the struggle democratically/peacefully. If he later has the support of the majority he can then ammend the constitution. For now he has to search his conscience. stop behaving as if he had won the majority vote.
Kerima
11-12-2012 12:10pm
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Extemely honest Baradie
The results of the referendum will only show a majority vote. It will not make a poorly written constitution representative of all Egyptians. This should have been done before the referendum and should have followed due process. Baradei is just trying to make us understand that Egypt can only move forward with a sound and fair constitution, no matter how long it takes to create. How does this make him dishonest?
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Roxana
11-12-2012 12:20am
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Map?
Where is the map that was mentioned in this article? Thanks!
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