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Egypt constitution referendum unofficial results: 'Yes' 56.5 pct
Unofficial final results of the constitution referendum's first round show a 56.5 per cent approval for the draft charter while 'No' votes reached 43.5 per cent
Ahram Online , Sunday 16 Dec 2012
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Preliminary results
Preliminary results of Egypt's constitutional poll (Photo: Mai Shaheen)

*Total:

"Yes":  4,595,311 (56.50 per cent)

"No": 3,536,838 (43.50 per cent)

Turnout: 33%

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Note: All results are from governorates' presiding judges, except Cairo's, which are from the tallies of the Freedom and Justice Party, the Popular Current operation centre and Al-Jazeera TV network. The final official result is to be announced after the second round, due on 22 December.

 

05:47 Final count in Cairo according to FJP:

"Yes": 950,532 (43.1 per cent)

"No": 1,256,248 (56.9 per cent)

 

04:44 Final count in Assiut:

"Yes": 449,431 (76.08 per cent)

"No": 141,244  (23.92 per cent)

 

04:25 The vote tally in the ten governorates so far after votes were counted in 6274 out of 6376 polling stations, according to Ikhwanweb:

"Yes": 4,558,953 (56.5 per cent)

"No": 3,508,751 (43.5 per cent)

 

04:20 Final count in Sharqiya:

"Yes": 736,929 (65.94 per cent)

"No": 380,520 (34.16 per cent)

 

04:10 The vote tally in the ten governorates so far, according to Ikhwanweb:

"Yes": 4,340,493 (57.3 per cent)

"No": 3,240,604 (42.7 per cent)

 

04:08 Final count in Aswan:

"Yes": 149,020 (76.65 per cent)

"No": 45,396 (23.35 per cent)

 

04:07 The vote tally in the ten governorates so far, according to Al-Hayat television after 65% of vote count:

"Yes": 2,796,458 (57.2 per cent)

"No": 2,094,523 (42.8 per cent)

 

03:55 Final count in North Sinai:

"Yes": 50,726 (78.06 per cent)

"No": 14,256 (21.94 per cent)

 

03:48 Final count in Sohag:

"Yes": 468,138 (79 per cent)

"No": 125,810 (21 per cent)

 

03:40 Final count in Daqahliya:

"Yes": 647,489 (55.1 per cent)

"No": 525,713 (44.9 per cent)

 

03:30 Ikhwanweb's final count in Alexandria:

"Yes": 665,985 (55.6 per cent)

"No": 531,221  (44.4 per cent)

 

03:17 The Nile Delta governorate of Gharbiya, home to the industrial hub of Mahalla Al-Kubra, votes against the draft constitution.

Al-Hayat television's final count in Gharbiya:

"No": 509,972 (52.13 per cent)

"Yes": 468,243 (49.87 per cent)

03:14 Al-Hayat television's final count in South Sinai:

"Yes": 8818 (57.72 per cent)

"No": 6458 (42.48 per cent)

03:06 In the Nile Delta governorate of Daqahliya, 55.9 per cent voted "yes" and 44.1 per cent voted "no" after votes were counted in 1021 out of the 1032 polling stations, according to Al-Ahram's Arabic news site.

02:39 According to updates from the Muslim Brotherhood's official website Ikhwanweb, results across the ten governorates after votes were counted in 3804 out of the total 6376 polling stations indicate that 60.9 per cent (2,676,749 votes) voted "yes" while 39.1 per cent (1,717,866 votes) voted "no."

02:16 In the Nile Delta governorate of Daqahliya, Al-Jazeera television has tabulated results from 979 out of the 1032 polling stations. The "yes" vote has so far received 628,188 of the vote (55.92 per cent) while the "no" vote has received 494,992 of the vote (44.08 per cent).

02:13 In President Mohamed Morsi's hometown in the Sharqiya Governorate, only 156 people voted "no" while an overwhelming 3271 voted "yes", according to Al-Ahram's Arabic news website.

02:01 In Mansoura, the largest city in the Nile Delta governorate of Daqahliya, 5000 people (34.71 per cent) voted "yes" while 9505 (65.29 per cent) voted "no," after votes were counted in nine polling stations, according to Al-Ahram's Arabic news site.

01:51 In the Upper Egyptian governorate of Sohag, votes have been counted in 628 out of the 635 polling stations. Results so far indicate that 79 per cent of the voters were in favour of the draft constitution while 21 per cent were against, according to Al-Hayat television.

01:48 Preliminary reports from Al-Jazeera in North Sinai indicate that 79 per cent voted "yes" while 21 per cent voted "no" after "most" of the votes were counted.

Al-Jazeera reports from South Sinai show that 64 per cent voted "yes" while 36 per cent voted "no".

01:28 In its latest update, Ikhwanweb says votes have been counted in 2230 out of 6376 polling stations across the ten governorates participating in the first phase. The "yes" vote has thus far reached 65.6 per cent while the "no" vote has reached 34.4 per cent.

01:10 According to Al-Hayat television, in Egypt's Nile Delta Gharbiya Governorate, the "yes" vote has reached 337,955 (52.15 per cent) and the "no" vote has reached 310,181 (47.85 per cent) after votes were counted in 610 out of 820 polling stations.

01:02 The Muslim Brotherhood states on its English-language Twitter account that votes are have been counted in 1875 out of the 6376 polling stations.

"Yes' votes are 64.5 per cent and 'no' are 35.4 per cent," the Brotherhood's official Ikhwanweb site reported.

12:47 According to Al-Hayat television, in the Upper Egyptian governorate of Aswan, the "yes" vote has reached 10,458 (86.58 per cent) and the "no" vote has reached 1,620 (13.42 per cent), after votes were counted in 21 polling stations.

12:30 According to Al-Hayat television, in the Egypt's Nile Delta Gharbiya Governorate, votes have been tallied in 488 out of the 820 polling stations. "Yes" votes are currently at 260,525 (53.66 per cent) and "no" votes are at 224,934 (46.34 per cent).

12:15 The Muslim Brotherhood says on its English-language Twitter account that votes had already been counted in 1385 out of 6376 polling stations in ten governorates.

"'Yes' votes are 65 per cent and 'no' are 35 per cent," the Brotherhood's official Ikhwanweb site reported.

12:00 Al-Jazeera television report that 83.9 per cent have voted "yes" and 16.1 per cent voted "no" after 50 per cent of the votes were counted in the Sohag Governorate in Upper Egypt.


As the first phase of Egypt’s constitutional referendum draws to a close, a resilient yet pensive mood was palpable among many voters. This contrasts with Egypt’s previous post-uprising referendums and polls, during which most voters could be seen smiling and proudly showing off their ink-stained fingers to news cameras.

Most voters who spoke to Ahram Online on Saturday expressed fear that, regardless of the outcome of the current constitutional poll, the coming period in Egypt would be ridden by political conflict and strife.

"There will be no stability in any case; this is a process that will take a long time," said one voter in the capital’s Old Cairo district. Divisions between supporters of President Mohamed Morsi and the opposition run deep; in some cases, fistfights erupted outside polling stations between members of Egypt’s two rival camps.

In addition to several reported violations, with some polling stations closing their doors much earlier than scheduled, many voters expressed frustration with the long lines and insufficient numbers of judges to supervise balloting. Some voters expressed the belief that voters were intentionally made to queue longer than necessary to dissuade them from casting their votes.

A few hours before the closure of polling stations nationwide, Supreme Electoral Commission (SEC) Secretary-General Zaghloul El-Balshi said that some 50 per cent of the 25 million registered voters in the ten governorates that cast ballots in the first phase of the poll had already voted.

The poll was largely trouble-free, but violence erupted late on Saturday when the Cairo headquarters of the liberal Wafd Party was attacked by unknown assailants. It remains unclear whether the attack was related to the constitutional referendum.

Mohamed Tharwat, managing editor of the Wafd Party’s news website, pointed the finger at prominent Salafist preacher Hazem Abu-Ismail, but the latter quickly denied any responsibility for the attack.

Ahram Online now begins the second leg if its live updates. We willl bring you the referendum's results, as they trickle in throughout the night.





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22



WARahman
18-12-2012 05:18pm
6-
7+
Get
To Al Ahram Editors and Journalists Thank you for providing coverage for non Egyptian. I following closely Egypt politic because of our love of Egypt who has produce a lot of graduates from your country's University.The oppossition must respective the chair of president Morsi and those he represent. He is democratically elected. The 3 stooges aren't. The judiciary isn't either. So please give him benefit of the doubt and always be objective.The loser cannot behave as if you are the winner.You put your self in his position.Talk the walk.
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21



KampungHighlander
17-12-2012 12:03pm
8-
11+
No Mandate
56.5 percent of the 33% who bothered to vote which means less than 20% of eligible voter actually voted in favour. No country in the world allows constitutional change with so low a level of support. Only the Muslim Brotherhood would think this is a mandate.
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20



Mohamed Ibrahim
17-12-2012 07:14am
1-
3+
Thank You to Ahram Online
I would like to Thank Ahram Online for giving us the just to talk and discuss matters and approving all comments. I would like to say we are all friends here and these are opinions on how we see things can turn out, so please people do not take anything any one says offensive we are not here to argue we are here to share thoughts to help one another understand different point of views, most importantly we all have 1 main important point that is in common and that is we all want Egypt to stand on its feet and for all people to unite. For a better Egypt 3
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19



TH
16-12-2012 11:58pm
5-
9+
Facts
Sorry to disappoint all the "islamists" about their "victory". With only 33% of the population voting and 56% saying yes, this means that only 18% of Egyptians have voted Yes to the new constitution. Shame on us to celebrate that Egypt will be governed under a constitution approved by only 18% of the people. We have a lot of work to do as a nation before we can move forward. We need reconciliation and dialogue. There are no winners yet until we have a document the majority of the nation is supportive of.
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18



Elhami Abdou
16-12-2012 11:50pm
4-
3+
THIS CONSTITUTION IS GOOD AND ORIGINAL
But, the part that is good is not original, and the part that is original is not good.
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17



Aladdin, Egypt
16-12-2012 05:54pm
5-
8+
Dark Future
It must get worse before it gey better. Egyptians gety what theydeserve.BH evil intent: Shut down tourism, increade unemployment, silence media, end art and modern culture,impose 30% taxes, split the country, violate international recognition for clear human rights violations, violates Islamic women rights, etc.
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16



300
16-12-2012 01:18pm
46-
42+
The Secularists
Are already trying to make excuses of why they lost, if you can't handle democracy go to a country that has a secular dictator like you wish to see in Egypt, sorry it's not going to happen.
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Atheist peacemaker
18-12-2012 03:59pm
6-
5+
56% way too small
No way can a constitution be accepted that is rejected by 43% of the country. I would say it needs 70% support to have legitimacy.
15



shafiq qazi
16-12-2012 12:01pm
52-
37+
alhamdulillah
grat victory for ikhwan and great chance to show the world fruits Islam
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14



mumby
16-12-2012 09:40am
4-
10+
be democcratic
Just narrow winning.
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13



Omar
16-12-2012 09:17am
24-
53+
Egypt constitution referendum unofficial results:
Any new constituition has to be made for the country as a whole (for the people by the people). For a new constitution to be valid and adopted in any country it has to be voted in by 75% of the population. Egypt already has a constitution (the old one), it is not logical to rush through an incomplete one and say we can fix it later! It like buying a horse with 3 legs and saying we will add the 4th leg later....it's not going to run! Better to take the time develop a truly representative constituition that is for all Egyptians. God Bless you all.
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patrick dooley
17-12-2012 01:49pm
0-
5+
Egypt's new constitution
Wise words Omar. Alas no one appears to be listening. This old Irishman watched in fascination when Mubarak was overthrown. I fear it has been hijacked. God Bless Egypt.
Abdul
17-12-2012 05:01am
8-
10+
You Guys will never be happy until you win
Don't try to undermine the people's opinion. Actually, the so called liberal, secularist, and leftist are not behaving in a democratic way. What is the definition of democracy? Where did you get that 75% of the population should vote "yes" to accept a constitution? It seems to me that democracy is only acceptable when you guys win the election, not Brotherhood. Try to be fair, please don't expose the dark side of mind of so called secularist and liberal.

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