Last Update 13:8
Upper Egypt protests over conversion to Christianity rumour
Alleged kidnapping and forced conversion to Christianity of Muslim woman provokes protests in Upper Egyptian governorate of Beni Suef
Ahram Online , Wednesday 20 Mar 2013
Share/Bookmark
Views: 980

Around two thousand people have protested in Upper Egypt against the alleged kidnapping and forced conversion to Christianity of a Muslim woman.

Protesters gathered in Al-Wasti in Beni Suef governorate on Tuesday to condemn what they claimed was the kidnapping last month of a 21-year-old woman by Christians. The woman was allegedly forced to marry a Coptic Christian man and sent to live in Turkey.

Security forces were deployed to protect the local church and police station.

The dispute began in February when members of the Salafist Nour Party and Al-Gamaa Al-Salafaya (the Salafist Group) gathered at Al-Wasti police station to protest the alleged kidnapping and forced conversion of the woman.

The woman's relatives had reportedly found a number of Christian books in her personal library, which led them to suspect involvement by the church in her disappearance.

This is not the first protest against an alleged kidnapping and forced conversion in recent months. In February, clashes erupted in Komombo in Aswan, Upper Egypt after local Muslims accused Christians of kidnapping a middle-aged Muslim woman and forcing her to convert to Christianity.

In May 2011, clashes erupted in Cairo after a rumour spread among ultra-conservative Salafists that a Christian woman, who had allegedly converted to Islam, was being held hostage at a church in Imbaba.

The clashes left at least twelve dead and over 50 injured. Two churches were burnt down.

Al-Wasti is in Beni Suef governorate in Upper Egypt. 





Short link:

 

Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
Ahram Online welcomes readers' comments on all issues covered by the site, along with any criticisms and/or corrections. Readers are asked to limit their feedback to a maximum of 4000 characters (roughly 200 words). All comments/criticisms will, however, be subject to the following code
  • We will not publish comments which contain rude or abusive language, libelous statements, slander and personal attacks against any person/s.
  • We will not publish comments which contain racist remarks or any kind of racial or religious incitement against any group of people, in Egypt or outside it.
  • We welcome criticism of our reports and articles but we will not publish personal attacks, slander or fabrications directed against our reporters and contributing writers.
  • We reserve the right to correct, when at all possible, obvious errors in spelling and grammar. However, due to time and staffing constraints such corrections will not be made across the board or on a regular basis.
3



patkar
21-03-2013 03:56pm
0-
0+
freedom of faith
as a new moslem of 13 years I think that everybody should be free to follow the religion that suits his/her belief and not be bound to the religion of birth ( parents ) as you can break their bones but you cannot break their mind !( I quote ) and it increases the determination of the convert. Where is the pre revolution ( 1952 ) Egypt when everybody lived in harmony , or almost ?What has gone wrong !
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
2



Born again
21-03-2013 01:25am
1-
0+
Relax and be happy
You can't "force" anyone to become a CHRISTIAN. Jesus said in the New Testament "if you deny me I will deny you" . The girl probably gave her life to Jesus and everyone else is lying or confused.
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment
1



Democracia
20-03-2013 03:52pm
1-
3+
Please Lord...
Oh Lord, let please rain some brain from the sky!!!It is desperately needed...
Email
 
Name
 
Comment's Title
 
Comment

© 2010 Ahram Online. Advertising