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Sunday, 17 November 2019

Egypt's NSF calls for Friday protest against president, prosecutor-general

National Salvation Front (NSF) calls on public to take part in rallies on Friday to show solidarity with activists it claims have been unfairly targeted by President Morsi and Egypt's top prosecutor

Zeinab El Gundy , Thursday 28 Mar 2013
Egypt
File photo: Riot police stand guard outside the Supreme Judicial House in Cairo, before the resignation of Public Prosecutor Talaat Ibrahim December 17, 2012 (Photo: Reuters)
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The National Salvation Front (NSF), Egypt’s leading opposition umbrella group, has called for Friday protests to show solidarity with political activists charged by the prosecutor-general with inciting violence during last week's clashes near the Muslim Brotherhood’s Cairo headquarters.

"We’re calling on the Egyptian people to participate in Friday’s protests in public squares throughout the country to show solidarity with icons of the opposition against the aggression of the prosecutor-general," leading NSF member Hussein Abdel-Ghani declared at a Wednesday press conference.

Abdel-Ghani went on to claim that "those pursuing these revolutionary icons are actually the counter-revolution."

The protest calls follow a decision by Prosecutor-General Talaat Abdullah to issue arrest warrants against four prominent “activists,” including Alaa Abdel-Fattah and Hazem Abdel-Azim. Both men have been charged with inciting violence against the Muslim Brotherhood’s headquarters in Cairo’s Moqattam district.

Some political figures and groups accuse Abdullah of having sympathies with the Muslim Brotherhood and ignoring complaints against Brotherhood officials who were accused of inciting violence during last December’s clashes outside the presidential palace in Cairo.

Protest demands will include Abdullah’s dismissal and the appointment of a new prosecutor-general according to the terms of Egypt’s new constitution.

Earlier this week, Cairo's Appeal Court overturned the appointment of Abdullah by President Mohamed Morsi in a highly controversial decree last November. It remains unclear whether the presidency will comply with the court order.

The NSF has also asserted that its planned protest would target Morsi and the latter’s recent “warnings” to the opposition. In a Wednesday statement, the NSF criticised Morsi and what it described as the president’s “threats against the Egyptian people.”

“The NSF denounces the president’s threats against the Egyptian people after a great revolution in which the people made it clear that they would not give in to any dictatorship,” the statement asserted. It went on to hold Morsi and his policies “completely responsible” for recent spates of political violence.

On Sunday, President Morsi warned Egyptian opposition parties and groups via Twitter against “providing violence with political cover.” Later the same day, Morsi said in a speech that he would not hesitate to use his executive right “to impose exceptional measures to restore domestic order.”

Along with the NSF, 12 political youth groups – including the ‘Free Front for Peaceful Change’ and the ‘Youth for Justice and Freedom’ movement – announced their intention to take part in Friday's planned protests.

The rally will be held under the motto ‘We are not threatened.’ Protest organisers say they hope to “send a message that we aren’t afraid of threats from the president and prosecutor-general.”

Protests in Cairo will be held outside the Supreme Court building and the nearby prosecutor-general's office in the capital’s downtown district.  

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AG
29-03-2013 03:55am
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When was the last time
When was the last time protests solved anything in Egypt?? Feb. 11th? And what was special about that? Oh, the vast majority of Egyptians wanted Mubarak gone and it wasn't just a fringe group. What's more? Mubarak Leaving didn't really solve the core problems in Egypt. Maybe the lesson is, Egyptians need to stop protesting and actually work on the problems. Of course, that won't happen because Egyptians love to talk talk talk and act like they are brilliant, but when it comes to doing work they'd rather someone else take that job on.
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John Andrews
29-03-2013 02:40am
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Totally devoted opposition
Egypt's opposition is totally devoted to serve their own purposes. They have a one-track mind set on grabbing power or burn Egypt in the process. They go hand-in-hand with felool, old regime holdovers and criminals... and have absolutely no political programs or strategies worth talking about. Ultimately, they will fade away.
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Sharif Shehata
29-03-2013 02:03am
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Please God give peace on Earth
As I believe in Freedom, Justice and Human rights but we need to know and understand how to use them in good manners. All we need to work together for the future of Egypt. We need to look over our shoulders to see what's happened around us in Greece,Cyprus and the reset of the world. Violence and protest will lead us to Dark Ages. We need to understand the politics is dirty business. We don't need to know everything, most importantly to deal with the country issues and to move Egypt forwards. We need to use our resources and becoming self - reliant. Mr President Mohamed Morsi and his Government should take responsibility for their own jobs. All we need to be honest and to do our jobs right. Egypt I am your Son, God Save Egypt.
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