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Thursday, 17 October 2019

Turkish protesters are 'alcoholics', says Egyptian Islamist leader

Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya leader brands Turkish anti-government protests an 'uprising of alcoholics'; says PM Erdogan is Islamist role model

Ahram Online, Monday 3 Jun 2013
Alaa Abu El-Nasr
Secretary general of the Building and Development party Alaa Abu El-Nasr (Photo: Al-Ahram)
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The protest movement in Turkey is an "uprising of alcoholics," a leader of Al-Gamaa Al-Islamiya has claimed. 

Alaa Abul-Nasr, who is a leader of the group's political wing, the Building and Development Party, went on to say Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan is a role model for Egyptian Islamists during an interview on Rotana Masriya TV channel on Sunday.

Protests against government plans to tear down trees in Istanbul's Taksim Square turned violent on Friday after a police crackdown.

Tighter restrictions on alcohol sales and warnings against public displays of affection have provoked protests by activists who accuse Erdogan's Justice and Development Party (AKP) of trying to turn secular-oriented Turkey into a more conservative country.

At least a thousand people have been injured during four days of clashes and more than 1700 arrested.

Erdogan’s popularity soared in 2011 when Turkey expelled the Israeli ambassador after Tel Aviv refused to apologise for its raid on the Mavi Marmara, a Gaza-bound flotilla. During the raid, eight Turks and an American of Turkish descent were killed.

Erdogan was granted a hero's reception on his arrival in Egypt in September 2011. Many of his most vocal supporters where members of the Muslim Brotherhood.

However, on 16 May 2013 US President Barack Obama stated that negotiations were ongoing between him and Erdogan over normalising relations with Israel.

Obama’s statement came after Israeli and Turkish officials began discussing compensation for the flotilla victims in April.

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mohammed moiduddin
04-06-2013 05:49am
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Freedom?
In every society there is good and bad. No country is immune. People want the freedom to do either. I only ask what would Prophet Muhammed (pbuh) say? If people don't want to follow Islam, then please leave goto USA or Europe. Go enjoy your heaven and paradise. You can not pick and choose what you want to follow either you are a Muslim and follow the rules or you are not.
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3



Robert Leroy
04-06-2013 01:46am
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It's not absurd
This is almost mostly correct. It's the people who want an easy life, an alcoholic, and not work for anything. They rather be loud and protest. The very loud minority. Yes. the police went overboard. No I am not a religious fanatic. I drink, but I don't expect handouts. I work hard for my money. How can anyone call someone a dictator that has been elected twice already for that position? Something smells bad here, and that's the smell of Raki. By the way, there are stricter alcohol laws in the united states and canada. Also, the restrictions do not affect hotels, bars, etc... mostly liquor store type businesses or something similar.
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Karim
03-06-2013 08:08pm
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11+
Long way...
The time of dictatorship is over everywhere. And most important that religion policy and extremism cannot rule the educated and modern nations. Egypt is only in the beggining of hard but at the end great way of separating religion and the state!!!
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Egyptian
03-06-2013 05:42pm
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26+
What A Shame
I cannot believe people like this guy exist in the 21st Century... I just cannot believe it. This man brings shame to us as Egyptians. Turks have the right to fight the fascist policies of Erdoğan just like Egyptians are fighting.
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Al-Misry
03-06-2013 07:30pm
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Alcoholism is not compatible with Islam
Islam brings nothing else but benefit to the whole mankind.Alcoholism in both Turky and Egypt will be placed to where they belong. Consume in your private places. Why 90% of the people do not consume alcohol. These citizens must have right to say alcohol out of public view. If you do not agree with this then you must be fighting a non winnable fight. Both leaders of Turk and Egypt are neither alcoholics nor fascists in fact they are saviers of both societies from falling further into mischief
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